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If I try to change some values in an duplicated array, the original array gets mysteriously also affected.

import numpy as np

x = np.zeros((3, 10))
y = x

print(x)
print(y, "\n")

y[1:3, 4:8] = 1

print(x)
print(y)

The output on my system is as follows:

[[ 0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.]
 [ 0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.]
 [ 0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.]]
[[ 0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.]
 [ 0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.]
 [ 0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.]]

[[ 0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.]
 [ 0.  0.  0.  0.  1.  1.  1.  1.  0.  0.]
 [ 0.  0.  0.  0.  1.  1.  1.  1.  0.  0.]]
[[ 0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.]
 [ 0.  0.  0.  0.  1.  1.  1.  1.  0.  0.]
 [ 0.  0.  0.  0.  1.  1.  1.  1.  0.  0.]]

I'm currently using NumPy 1.6.2 as a 64bit version compiled against the Intel MKL (from Christoph Gohlke) together with Python 3.2.3. I also tried the 32bit "official" version but got exactly the same results...

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You did not create a copy of the array. You simply created a new reference to the same array. If you want to copy the array use numpy.copy:

y = numpy.copy(x)

Note that with regular python lists you can obtain a shallow copy with the syntax the_list[:](where [:] means create a slice that start at the beginning and ends at the end of the original list), while numpy slices are actually views in most cases:

>>> import numpy as np
a>>> a = np.arange(10)
>>> b = a[:]
>>> b[0] = 100
>>> a
array([100, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])
>>> b
array([100, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])

Versus:

>>> a = range(10)
>>> b = a[:]    # does a real copy
>>> b[0] = 100
>>> a
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
>>> b
[100, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

In python every identifier is a reference to an object. When you do an assignment:

y = x

The assignment binds the name y to the object referenced by x. In other words y becomes a copy of the reference of x. Now the objected referenced by x has one more reference. When an object doesn't have anymore references it is deleted from memory. Python hasn't got the concept of "variables" as seen in C.

An other way of thinking is that any identifier is a pointer to an object. Thus y = x copies the pointer and not the object itself(and this is what actually happens. The C/API always uses pointers to PyObject structures)

This is explained in every python tutorial, hence I'd suggest you to put aside numpy for a bit and read a python tutorial first.


I've decided to illustrate what happens with the bind using some Unicode art. The idea is not mine, but of user Claudio_F from the python-it.org forum.

The idea is that in python you have identifiers, which I'll represent as buoys. Each buoy can be connected to an object, which is represented as a rock(or whatever) under the sea. An object can be bound to more buoys. When an object is not bound to any buoy it sinks in the sea and when it reaches the bottom of the sea a huge sea monster destroys it (a.k.a the garbage collector).

Now when you do the assignment:

a = 5

This is the situation:

             ___
            (   )
            ( a )
            (   )
^~~~~^~~~~^~~'¿'~~~~^~~~~~^~~~~~^~~~~~~
              |
  O        .--+--.         o    ___
           |  5  |           |\/  x\
           .-----.            ^\_/


             ___             O
    o       /o  \/|
            〉 GC  |       o      o
            \___/\|
        (   
   )     )             (
  (     (      )        )        )
(  )  )  )    (   (    ( (    ) ( (
 )(  (  (   (  )   )    ) )  (   ) )

When you do the assignment:

b = a

Both buoys are bound to the same object:

            ___               ___
           (   )             (   )
           ( a )             ( b )
           (   )             (   )
^~~~^~~~~^~~'¿'~~~~~^~~~~^~~~~'¿'~~~~^~~~~~^
             \        o       /
              \     o        /
               \     O      /
                \          /    __________
                 \        /    /          \
       o          \      /    /            \
                   \    /       )  | (  | )
     O              \  /       (   |  )  (
        o            \/            | (    )
                  .--+--.             )
                  |  5  |
                  .-----.



             ___             O
    o       /o  \/|
            〉 GC  |       o      o
            \___/\|
        (   
   )     )             (
  (     (      )        )        )
(  )  )  )    (   (    ( (    ) ( (
 )(  (  (   (  )   )    ) )  (   ) )

When you do the third assignment:

a = 7

The a chain is untied from the 5 object and bound to a new, 7, object but b's buoy remains bound to 5:

            ___               ___
           (   )             (   )
           ( a )             ( b )
           (   )             (   )
^~~~^~~~~^~~'¿'~~~~~^~~~~^~~~~'¿'~~~~^~~~~~^
             |         o       |
             |                 |
             |     O           |      o
             |                 |
     o       |                 |
             |        o        |
             |              .--+--.
   O      .--+--.           |  5  |
          |  7  |           .-----.
          .-----.

     o     



             ___             O
    o       /o  \/|
            〉 GC  |       o      o
            \___/\|
        (   
   )     )             (
  (     (      )        )        )
(  )  )  )    (   (    ( (    ) ( (
 )(  (  (   (  )   )    ) )  (   ) )

I hope you enjoyed the pictures and that they made clear how it works. (The jellyfish and the dead fish are there just because I thought they were cool)

By the way, this representation is also awesome to understand reference between objects. For example the code:

L = [1,2,3]

Would be represented like this:

                ___
               (   )
               ( L )
               (   )
 ^~~~~^~~~~^~~~~'¿'~~~~^~~~~^~~~~^~~~~^
                 |
                 |
        .--------+----------.
        | [ '¿', '¿', '¿' ] |
        .----|----|----|----.
            /     |     \
           /      |      \
       .--+--.    |    .--+--.
       |  1  |    |    |  3  |
       .-----.    |    .-----.
                  |
               .--+--.
               |  2  |
               .-----.



             ___             O
    o       /o  \/|
            〉 GC  |       o      o
            \___/\|
        (   
   )     )             (
  (     (      )        )        )
(  )  )  )    (   (    ( (    ) ( (
 )(  (  (   (  )   )    ) )  (   ) )

Note how the list has "pointers" to the objects, and not the actual objects.

Also, going back to slicing, if you do:

R = L[:]

You obtain this scenario:

                ___                        ___
               (   )                      (   )
               ( L )                      ( R )
               (   )                      (   )
 ^~~~~^~~~~^~~~~'¿'~~~~^~~~~^~~~~^~~~~^~~~~'¿'~~~~~~^~~~~~^~~~~~
                 |                          |
                 |                          |
        .--------+----------.     .---------+---------.
        | [ '¿', '¿', '¿' ] |     | [ '¿', '¿', '¿' ] |
        .----|----|----|----.     .----|----|----|----.
             \     \    \             /    /    /
              \     \    \           /    /    /
               \     \    \         /    /    /
                \     \    \       /    /    /
                 \     \    \     /    /    /
                  \     \    \   /    /    /
                   \     \    \ /    /    /
                    \     | .--+--. |    /
                     \    | |  1  | |   /
                      \   | .-----. |  /
                       \   \       /  /
                        \   \     /  /
                         \   \   /  /
                          |   \ /   |
                          | .--+--. |
                          | |  2  | |
                          | .-----. |
                           \       /
                            \     /
                             \   /
                              \ /
                            .--+--.
                            |  3  |
                            .-----.



             ___             O
    o       /o  \/|
            〉 GC  |       o      o
            \___/\|
        (                                (
   )     )             (                  )   (     
  (     (      )        )        )       (  )  )     )        (
(  )  )  )    (   (    ( (    ) ( (    )  )(  (  (  (          )(
 )(  (  (   (  )   )    ) )  (   ) )  (  (  )  )  )  )      ) (  )

Note that both lists point to the same objects. That's why it's called shallow copy. If, instead of integers, you put some mutable object, like an other list, you can clearly understand why modifying it will change the contents of both lists.

share|improve this answer
    
Ahh... way too affected by MATLAB. Thanks for the additional information, but wouldn't that also mean that for a = 5; b = a; a = 7 b should be 7 (which is clearly not the case)? –  Johannes Feb 5 '13 at 13:08
    
@Johannes I've updated my answer with a more intuitive explanation of the bahaviour of binding in python. –  Bakuriu Feb 5 '13 at 16:44
    
Wow, very elaborate. Thanks! –  Johannes Feb 6 '13 at 13:04

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