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Well the title of question says it all.

I have some points to make before I present code:

  • If I know that a particular type of exception occur in specific set of statements then is it good practice to put them all in single try put corresponding catch immediately?
  • Or should I put all exception prone code in single code block and put all corresponding catch blocks after that single try. is there any performance cost associated with it?

    {   
        try
        {
             exec();//can cause ExceptionXYZ
        }
        catch(ExceptionXYZ e){ }            
        try
        {
             exec(); //can cause ExceptionPQR
        }
        catch(ExceptionPQR e){ }
            try
        {
             exec(); //can cause ExceptionABC
        }
        catch(ExceptionABC e){ }
    }
    

So does the above way is good or below one

    {
        try
        {
             exec(); //can cause ExceptionXYZ          
             exec(); // can cause ExceptionPQR        
             exec(); //can cause ExceptionABC
        }
        catch(ExceptionXYZ e){ }
        catch(ExceptionPQR e){ }
        catch(ExceptionABC e){ }
    }

Also there can be possibility of mixing above two patterns, like nesting try in try. Any other considerations/points about which to use when? One thing is sure nesting complicates the code a bit.

There are some other considerations (in nesting under finally block) in other scenarios like when closing database-JDBC resources wherein we have to handle every close independently just to ensure that NullPointerException in one close() doesnt leave other resources open:

    try
    { } 
    catch(Exception e)
    { }
    finally
    {
        if (rs != null)  //ResultSet
            try 
            {
                rs.close();
            }
            catch(SQLException se1)
            {
                se1.printStackTrace();
            }
        if(pstmt!=null)  //PreparedStatement
            try
            {
                pstmt.close();
            }
            catch(SQLException se2)
            {
                se2.printStackTrace();
            }
        if(conn!=null)   //Connection
            try
            {
                conn.close();
            }
            catch (SQLException se3) 
            {
                se3.printStackTrace();
            }   
    }

Any thoughts? Or am just over-thinking unncessarily.

Edit

Some more considerations / facts (over thinking :p)

  • Just generalizing things: If at all there are some code blocks all of which need to be executed in any case then we should put them on separate try-catch and any other code out of these catch blocks should not cause any exception:

    {
       try
       {
          mustexec(); 
       }
       catch(){ }
    
       noexceptionexec();   
    
       try
       {
          mustexec();
       }
       catch() { }
    }
    
  • Ensuring least fall through catch(): If we are sure that some set of statements can cause a particular set of Exception, we should put those code lines in try handling only corresponding Exception instead of puting it after outer try. So above third case (mixing pattern) can be the one suitable:

    {
        try
        {
           exec(); //can cause ExceptionXYZ
        }
        catch(ExceptionABC){ }
        catch(ExceptionPQR){ }
        catch(ExceptionXYZ){ }
    }
    

Above may be a bit in-efficient than

    {
        try
        {
           try
           {
              exec(); //can cause ExceptionXYZ
           }
           catch(ExceptionXYZ){ }
        }
        catch(ExceptionABC){ }
        catch(ExceptionPQR){ }
    }
share|improve this question
    
The third one is really a finally, which is a must for JDBC cons. But out of the first 2 , i will say go for the 2nd one, as that is more performance driven and will reduce code clutter . –  The Dark Knight Feb 5 '13 at 13:34

8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Code1 and Code2 aren't equivalent.

try{
   exec1();
   exec2(); // if exec1 fails,  it is not executed
}catch(){}

try{
   exec1();
}catch(){}
try{
   exec2(); // if exec1 fails,  it is  executed
}catch(){}

And for point3 Yes. you can mix your code.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. I didn't think about that, it went obvious in my eyes and I simply skipped this "detail" (which is not a detail of course) –  ThanksForAllTheFish Feb 5 '13 at 13:36
    
+1, this is always something to think about when handling exceptions. Though when assigning something in a try catch and then using it later, you need to also remember if an exception is thrown that object will be null and your program must be able to handle that null. (Database connections come to mind.) –  Logan Feb 5 '13 at 14:41

It is also possible to use just one try-catch, see following:

try {
    // some code that throws different exceptions
}
catch (Exception ex)            
{                
    if (ex is ExceptionA)
    {
        //do something
    }
    else if (ex is ExeptionB)
    {
        //do something
    }
}

and so on

share|improve this answer
    
I think this isn't any good way. For same purpose we specify multiple catch for same try. I mean, its quite weird to check Exception type in if(), Am I wrong? –  Mahesha999 Feb 5 '13 at 13:49
    
Java uses instanceof not is :P –  Logan Feb 5 '13 at 14:38

You are overthinking, as you wrote. Just check out official Oracle documentation at http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/exceptions/catch.html and you will clearly see the suggested way to handle exception is

try {

} catch (ExceptionType name) {

} catch (ExceptionType name) {

}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes this is really a typical pattern but other patterns may be absolute necesary depending upon scenarios. Just edited the question to explain necessity of others. Hope am thinking right. –  Mahesha999 Feb 5 '13 at 14:16

If I am introducing a catch block at all, I prefer keeping it closer to the code that may throw the corresponding exception, for the same reason why I declare variables closer to the place where they are used - i.e. better readability. For that reason, your first example is clearly preferable.

Combining try/catch with a sequence of if statements is not as clean, because it requires the reader of your code to have much better understanding of what's going on above the exception handler block: specifically, in your example the reader must know that only one condition will be true.

Although sesting exception handlers as in the cleanup code is sometimes necessary, it is usual to "drop" the second-level exception during cleanup, reporting only the first-level exception.

share|improve this answer

Entering and leaving try/catch costs zero CPU time if there were no exceptions. Dispatching an exception to proper catch block could probably cost slightly more CPU if there are many try/catch blocks in the method, because JVM needs to find proper catch among the others. For me you are overthinking here.

share|improve this answer

The first (and possibly) only thing you should consider is how to write the simplest and clearest code you can. Only after you have a working application which might have performance problems and you have profiled to determine you have measurable issue. The you can compare alternatives to see if one is better than another.

Until you have established you have a performance issue, I would stick to writing the simplest code you can.

Note: can you assume that if an exception is thrown in the first block you can continue as if it didn't matter, often this is not the case and it makes more sense to wrap all the code in a try/catch block.

share|improve this answer

Nesting verses not nesting is a design decision. If you can recover from the exception, then nesting seems good. If the exception is terminal, then not nesting seems good. Here is an example:

try
{
   try
   {
     ... code that may throw RecoverableException1 or TerminalException
   }
   catch (RecoverableException1 exception)
   {
     ... recover.  Perhaps use default values and add a log entry.
   }


   try
   {
     ... code that may throw RecoverableException2 or TerminalException
   }
   catch (RecoverableException2 exception)
   {
     ... recover.  Perhaps use default values and add a log entry.
   }

}
catch (TerminalException exception)
{
  ... log the terminal exception and terminate.
}
share|improve this answer

I think that your primary concerns should be:

  1. the correctness of the code, and then

  2. the readability of the code.

As others have pointed out, the two forms in your examples don't mean the same thing. There is a good chance that one of the forms is more correct than the other one.

If you have two versions that are equally correct, then the best version is the version that is most readable.

You cannot make a sound judgement on relative correctness or readability based on artificial examples like this. So the bottom line is that there is no best practice rule for this decision.


Assuming that the two versions of the code are equally correct and equally readable, there is a small performance advantage in using multiple try/catch blocks versus one try/catch with multiple handlers. It is all down to what happens when an exceptions are handled. If there are multiple catch blocks, then the JVM does the equivalent of an instanceof for each catch block in turn until it finds one that matches (or exhausts them). If you have N catch blocks, that is up to N tests that need to be performed.

However, I should stress that the difference is small, and especially so when you consider that exceptions should be exceptional; i.e. you should not need to handle an exception in the vast majority of cases. (And if that assumption is incorrect, then you probably have bigger performance problems, because the most expensive part of Java exceptions is typically the construction of the exception object.)

share|improve this answer
    
This answer actually explains the performance cost OP is asking about. +1. –  Logan Feb 5 '13 at 14:42

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