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class SimpleConsumer extends Threads {
        public SyncQueue q;
        SimpleConsumer(SyncQueue q) { this.q = q; }
        public void run () { doit(); }
        public synchronized void doit() {
            while(true){
                try{
                    while(q.isEmpty()) { wait(); }
                    System.out.println((String)q.Dequeue());
                } 
                catch (Exception e) { System.out.println("Got exception:" +e); }
            }
        }    
    }

And I have another class that adds items to the same object SyncQueue and does notifyAll();

class SimpleProducer extends Threads {
public SyncQueue q;
SimpleProducer(SyncQueue q) { this.q = q; }
public void run() { doit(); }
public synchronized void doit() {
    while(true){
        try{
            sleep(1000);
            q.Enqueue("Item");
            notifyAll();
            } catch(Exception e) { System.out.println("Got exception:" +e); }
        }
    }
}
} 

Will the SimpleConsumer wake up if I do notifyAll() from a different class method?

share|improve this question
    
What happened when you tried it? –  Dave Newton Feb 5 '13 at 14:09
    
SimpleConsumer did not wakeup... –  TheNotMe Feb 5 '13 at 14:09
    
That answers that question then. –  Dave Newton Feb 5 '13 at 14:14
    
You have to wait on the same object notifyAll is being called on. BTW Whatever you are trying to do would be simpler using an ExecutorService. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 5 '13 at 14:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are waiting and notifying on 2 different objects - so they won't talk to each other. You need to use a common object and call the wait and notifyAll methods on that common object.

For example:

class SimpleConsumer extends Threads {
    private final SyncQueue q;

    SimpleConsumer(SyncQueue q) {
        this.q = q;
    }

    public void doit() {
        while(true){
            try{
                synchronized(q) {
                    while(q.isEmpty()) { q.wait(); }
                    System.out.println((String)q.Dequeue());
                }
            } 
            catch (Exception e) { System.out.println("Got exception:" +e); }
        }
    }    
}

Note:

  • I have made q private and final to make sure the reference is not changed externally.
  • the monitor for the synchronized block in now the queue itself instead of this.
share|improve this answer
2  
Exactly. Synchronization should be done on queue. –  Andrew Logvinov Feb 5 '13 at 14:12
    
Thanks alot! Simple and nice. –  TheNotMe Feb 5 '13 at 14:12
    
@OP Please note that this requires the synchronized blocks to use that object as a monitor as well (so: synchronized (monitor) { as opposed to declaring the method synchronized. –  akaIDIOT Feb 5 '13 at 14:14
    
So, I can not do q.wait() in the consumer if I don't do the synchronized(q) block? –  TheNotMe Feb 5 '13 at 14:26
    
@TheNotMe When you call someObject.wait(), you need to be inside a synchronized(someObject) block or you will get an IllegalMonitorException at runtime. You should check the javadoc which explains all that. –  assylias Feb 5 '13 at 14:29

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