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I'm trying to reorganize an array based on the first occurrence of a value (thus simulating similar functionality to a circular array.)

For example, in the following array I wish the first occurrence of the value 6 to become the new first element, and prior elements to become the latter:

So:

int[] myArray = {2, 3, 6, 1, 7, 6};

Becomes:

myArray = {6, 1, 7, 6, 2, 3};

What is the "best" way to achieve this?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted
int[] myArray = { 2, 3, 6, 1, 7, 6 };
myArray = myArray
            .SkipWhile(i => i != 6)
            .Concat(myArray.TakeWhile(i => i != 6))
            .ToArray();

Should do the trick!

You will need a using System.Linq;

Kindness,

Dan

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2  
it's weird: no one read the specification. You are the only one here with a correct answer, and you're getting down voted. People, the OP said "first occurrence of the value 6 to become the new first element" - not shifting the array in a known number of cells. –  Kobi Sep 24 '09 at 12:43
    
Have an upvote on me! –  Christian Hayter Sep 24 '09 at 12:49
    
@Kobi: I suppose you're right. It's of course trivial to first do a linear search for the appropriate index, but it should be included. I edited my answer a bit. –  Joren Sep 24 '09 at 12:57
    
After having tested this solution I've chosen to accept it as my answer for 2 reasons. 1) It blends in with my current project (where I need this functionality) very well & is quite readable. 2) Anything with LINQ in it looks sexy to me! :) –  Mike Sep 24 '09 at 13:24
2  
@Kobi: That's exactly what my solution and Jon Skeets solution are doing as well. Saying "The first occurence of value X should be the first" is equal to saying "skip all before X, copy from there, append all from 0 to first occurance of X". While there are wrong answers here, this one is not the only one that is correct! –  Thorsten Dittmar Sep 24 '09 at 14:21

Thorsten's solution creates a new array; here's an in place version which only creates a temporary array as large as the amount your rotation size:

public static void RotateLeft<T>(T[] array, int places)
{
    T[] temp = new T[places];
    Array.Copy(array, 0, temp, 0, places);
    Array.Copy(array, places, array, 0, array.Length - places);
    Array.Copy(temp, 0, array, array.Length - places, places);
}

I'm sure it could be done with just a single temporary buffer item, but it would be more complicated :)

As an efficiency measure, here's a "rotate left one place" shortcut:

public static void RotateLeft<T>(T[] array)
{
    T temp = array[0];
    Array.Copy(array, 0, array, 1, array.Length - 1);
    array[array.Length-1] = temp;
}
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I added an implementation of your single temporary buffer idea to my answer. I'm pretty sure it's correct, although I haven't gone through the trouble of proving it. :) –  Joren Sep 24 '09 at 12:28
1  
Who am I to question Jon Skeet, but does your solution not create a new array as well? I'd say it's just the same as my solution, only you're copying back to "array" in the end (which is a trivial step that I left out :-) )? –  Thorsten Dittmar Sep 24 '09 at 12:28
2  
It does create a new one, but it creates an array that's as large as the amount of places to skip, while your idea creates an array that's as large as the original array. skip < array.Length will always hold (since any larger skip would be equivalent to skip % array.Length, which is smaller than array.Length again) so Jon's implementation uses less space. A lot less space for large arrays and small rotations, and only a bit less for large rotations or small arrays. –  Joren Sep 24 '09 at 12:40
    
Ahhh, I see. He who has eyes, let him see :-) –  Thorsten Dittmar Sep 24 '09 at 12:43

You could do the following:

  1. Create new array of same size as original
  2. Determine your "Start index"
  3. Use Array.Copy() to copy everything from start index to end of source array to destination array
  4. Use Array.Copy() to copy everything from 0 to start index of source array to the end of the destination array

That way you get a copy of your source array that looks as you expected.

You'll have to play with various overloads of Array.Copy(), however, because I don't know the exact parameter values right now.

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To begin with, do a linear search to find the first occurrence of the value that you want to make the first element:

// value contains the value to find.

int skip;
for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
{
    if (array[i] == value)
    {
        skip = i;
        break;
    }
}

// skip contains the index of the element to put at the front.
// Equivalently, it is the number of items to skip.
// (I chose this name for it because it makes the subtractions
// in the Array.Copy implementation more intuitive.)

Do you want to change the actual array? Then do what Thorsten Dittmar suggests:

int[] array = new int[] { 2, 3, 6, 1, 7, 6 };
int[] result = new int[array.Length];

int skip = 2; // So that array[skip] will be result[0] at the end

Array.Copy(array, skip, result, 0, array.Length - skip);
Array.Copy(array, 0, result, array.Length - skip, skip);

Do you want to just view the array in the new order, without doing anything else? Then index it like so:

array[(i + skip) % array.Length]  // Instead of array[i]

Edit: Just for laughs, an implementation of Jon Skeet's suggestion to implement the copy while using only a single buffer value (sourceValue):

// GCD gives the greatest common divisor
int gcd = GCD(array.Length, skip);

// period is the length of the permutation cycles in our rotation.
int period = array.Length / gcd;

int max = array.Length / period;
for (int i = 0; i < max; i++)
{
    int sourceIndex = i;
    int sourceValue = array[sourceIndex];

    for (int n = 1; n <= period; n++)
    {
        int destinationIndex = (sourceIndex + array.Length - skip) % array.Length;

        int temp = array[destinationIndex];
        array[destinationIndex] = sourceValue;
        sourceValue = temp;

        sourceIndex = destinationIndex;
    }
}
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Of course, you could just as easily place these values in a new array: shiftedArray[i] = ... –  Kobi Sep 24 '09 at 11:16
    
Yes you could, hence my first sentence. The rest of my answer was about how you would do it without copying the array, which might be useful if you have a really large array. I've since edited it to include an implementation of Thorsten's idea. –  Joren Sep 24 '09 at 11:20
    
Fantastic detail here! Slightly scary as your last update to include the loop which skips to the desired element is character identical to what I implemented in my testing solution! Thank-you for your help and I'm loving the fact you keep coming up with alternative solutions to this! –  Mike Sep 24 '09 at 13:22
    
There are only so many ways to do a linear search. ;) –  Joren Sep 24 '09 at 14:29

As an alternative to creating a new array, you can wrap it with a class:

class CircularList<T> : IList<T>
{
    static IEnumerable<T> ToEnumerator(CircularList<T> list)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
        {
            yield return list[i];
        }
    }

    IList<T> arr;
    public int Shift { get; private set; }
    public CircularList(IList<T> arr, int shift)
    {
        this.arr = arr;
        this.Shift = shift;
    }

    int shiftIndex(int baseIndex)
    {
        return (baseIndex + Shift) % arr.Count;
    }

    #region IList<T> Members

    public int IndexOf(T item) { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    public void Insert(int index, T item) { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    public void RemoveAt(int index) { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    public T this[int index]
    {
        get { return arr[shiftIndex(index)]; }
        set { arr[shiftIndex(index)] = value; }
    }

    #endregion

    #region ICollection<T> Members

    public void Add(T item) { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    public void Clear() { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    public bool Contains(T item) { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    public void CopyTo(T[] array, int arrayIndex) { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    public int Count { get { return arr.Count; } }
    public bool IsReadOnly { get { throw new NotImplementedException(); } }
    public bool Remove(T item) { throw new NotImplementedException(); }

    #endregion

    #region IEnumerable<T> Members

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return ToEnumerator(this).GetEnumerator();
    }

    #endregion

    #region IEnumerable Members

    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return ToEnumerator(this).GetEnumerator();
    }

    #endregion
}

This program:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int[] myArray = { 2, 3, 6, 1, 7, 6 };
        CircularList<int> circularList =
            new CircularList<int>(myArray, Array.IndexOf<int>(myArray, 6));

        foreach (int i in circularList)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(i);
        }
    }
}

Prints the following:

6
1
7
6
2
3
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Kudos for sheer effort. I like this. –  Mike Sep 24 '09 at 13:34
var ar = new[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };
ar = ar.SkipWhile(a => a != 6).ToArray<int>();
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C# answer: input : { 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8 }; Output : { 8, 7 1, 2, 3, 5, 6};

{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int[] array = { 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8 };
        int index = 2;
        int[] tempArray = new int[array.Length];
        array.CopyTo(tempArray, 0);

        for (int i = 0; i < array.Length - index; i++)
        {
            array[index + i] = tempArray[i];
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < index; i++)
        {
            array[i] = tempArray[array.Length -1 - i];
        }            


    }
}
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