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please how can i write definition of constructor with parameters outside class declaration?

class A{
 public:
  A(int x);
  ~A();
}

A::A(int x) { ... }
A::~A(){...}


class B : public A
{
 public:
  B(int x):A(x){ this work fine}
  ~B(){}

}

and this not work

class B : public A
{
 public:
  B(int x):A(x); // error here
  ~B();

}

B::B(int x):A(x){ this not work };
B::~B();
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Lightness Races in Orbit, DocMax, Abyx, Radu Murzea, Hristo Iliev Feb 5 '13 at 15:58

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
possible duplicate of The Definitive C++ Book Guide and List – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 5 '13 at 15:12
1  
Unrelated: the destructor of B isn't needed at all (all it does it confused the trained eyes of good C++ programmers that will be lead to believe the class violates the rule of three.) – R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 5 '13 at 15:14
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes: Still, best to have it so that it can be given a non-trivial implementation later without breaking the API! Though, sure, by the same logic we should declare a destructor, copy constructor and assignment op for every type which would be daft. Hmm. If it were appropriate on SO I'd post a question about this. – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 5 '13 at 15:16
    
Thanks for answers . I solved it. I rewrite a program and problem was elsewhere. The compiler said no ; after B(int x) and redefinition for B::B(int x):A(x). – Pepík Samků Feb 5 '13 at 15:35
    
@PepíkSamků: Don't forget to write an answer and accept it. Except... you were already given the answer. – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 5 '13 at 15:53
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're mixing declaration with implementation. It should be:

class B : public A
{
 public:
  B(int x);
  ~B();    
}

B::B(int x):A(x){ /*this works */ };
B::~B() {}
share|improve this answer
3  
and you are too... Perhaps define a body on B::~B? And ; after the class? And the ; after the method body can go... – sehe Feb 5 '13 at 15:12
    
that happens when you copy-paste... :( – Marius Bancila Feb 5 '13 at 20:13

This question seems to be collecting an unusual number of incorrect answers (though some look like they're probably a result of oversight, not misunderstanding).

The situation is pretty simple. Inside the class definition you can have either a member function declaration or a member function definition. Outside the class definition you can only have a function definition (in which case, inside the class definition, you must only declare that function, not define it). That means the corrected code looks something like this:

class B : public A {  // This is the class definition.
public:
    B(int x);    // declare member functions here.
    ~B();
};

// define member functions here.
//
B::B(int x) : A(x) { /* body */ }
B::~B() { /* body */ }      // a declaration like `B::~B();` is not allowed here.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks i solved it ! – Pepík Samků Feb 5 '13 at 15:37

B(int x):A(x); // error here

You removed the body of the method, but you forgot to remove the member initialization list:

B(int x); // No error

In addition, you need to put semicolons after the last closing brace of your class definitions.

share|improve this answer
    
hmm, I can't undo my downvote because you edited while it was still fresh, and SO thinks it hasn't been edited since I voted – Jonathan Wakely Feb 5 '13 at 14:44
    
ah that's better – Jonathan Wakely Feb 5 '13 at 14:56
1  
"initialization list" is a very confusing description for this language feature, especially now that we have std::initializer_list. Let's call it the "member initialization list" (which is its real name), or ctor-initializer (which is also its real name). – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 5 '13 at 15:15
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit I guess you're right, shortening to "initialization list" introduces confusion. This is fixed now, thank you very much! – dasblinkenlight Feb 5 '13 at 15:19
    
@dasblinkenlight: Everybody's welcome! – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 5 '13 at 15:21

Try

class B : public A
{
 public:
  B(int x);
  ~B();
};

B::B(int x):A(x){ }
B::~B() {}
share|improve this answer

This is your code:

class B : public A
{
 public:
  B(int x):A(x); // error here
  ~B();

}

When you do something like ~B(); you are declarating the existence of the destructor, but since you ended up there (note the ";") you did not define it. The same goes on the constructor, in the line that you marked you you invoked the super constructor, which is a definition, but you did not provide the method body, which is only expected on declarations.

To fix your problem just leave the declaration as B(int x);, without specifying how B relates with A, this will be later specified later in the definition.

Calling the super constructor is part of the generated code, the caller does not need to know about that, that why you can declare a constructor without define how it will construct it's super classes.

share|improve this answer
2  
-1: This is not valid C++ code. – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 5 '13 at 15:14
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit I copy pasted the Pepík Samků code and changed only the part concerning his questions... Are you going to downvote me because I did not fix the missing ';'? – André Puel Feb 5 '13 at 15:49
    
Yes. And because you did not write any prose in your answer. Good answers explain the problem, then explain the solution, then provide code to demonstrate the solution. – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 5 '13 at 15:51
    
I will remove my downvote only when your answer does not suggest using invalid C++ code. Hopefully this will serve as a lesson not to simply copy/paste potentially broken code from the web! – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 5 '13 at 15:52
    
I just though he would prefer a quick answer to his problem. If it may concern you, I find it offensive that you suggest that I "simple copy/paster broken code from the web", of course I don't do that... But, if you insist, I gave an insight on why his problem was happening... – André Puel Feb 5 '13 at 16:14

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