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I am trying to apply the Singleton design pattern in the below code

class SMSMgr( object ):
    _instance = None
    def __init__(self):
            self._allsp = []
    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        if not cls._instance:
            cls._instance = super(SMSMgr, cls).__new__(
                                cls, *args, **kwargs)
        return cls._instance

    def loadsettings(self):
        get_all_sp = ServiceProvider.objects.filter(status = False)
        for obj in get_all_sp:
            cla = obj.class_Name
            a=globals()[str(obj.class_Name)](obj.userName,obj.password,obj.sendingurl)
            self._allsp.append(a)
            #print self._allsp
    def send(self):
        print "+++++++++++++++++++== Global send "


if __name__ == "__main__":

    b = SMSMgr()
    b.loadsettings()
    print b._allsp
    print "b end -------------------"
    c = SMSMgr()
    c.loadsettings()
    print c._allsp
    print "c end -------------------"

According to singleton b object should be same as c object . But when i am running this above code i am getting the different objects for b and c Please suggest me how can i do this as a Singleton.

share|improve this question
    
The Singleton pattern in this form is a borrowing from Java, and I don't understand why people are so attached to it. You are working hard to make a class that lies: it looks to the caller like they are making a new instance, and you are manipulating things behind the scenes so that they are not. Why not just give them a single instance to use? Or a factory function that produces the instance to use? This is confusing in implementation, and confusing to use. –  Ned Batchelder Feb 5 '13 at 15:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm pretty sure the problem here is that there is no sentinel for your __init__, so even though each instantiation returns the same object, __init__ is being rerun each time as well. You could try something like this:

def __init__(self):
    if not hasattr(self, '_allsp'):
        self._allsp = []

Though for a more robust solution, you probably want something more like:

def __init__(self):
    if not hasattr(self.__class__, 'inited'):
        self._allsp = []
        self.__class__.inited = True

Just be aware that this is not thread safe unless you wrap the init functionality in a lock of some sort.

As @mgilson eludes to in his answer though, if you are trying to create a singleton in Python, you probably should just be using class attributes instead of instance attributes, and looking at whether it even makes sense for the class to be completely separate to begin with, or to fold it in to some other, non-singleton class. There's also a pattern, the borg pattern, that is frequently mentioned when singetons and Python are brought up in the same paragraph.

share|improve this answer
    
please ue some program so that i can figure out –  masterofdestiny Feb 5 '13 at 14:42
    
thanks it works one more thing how can i call it on different file like oo = SMSMgr() print oo._allsp it is returning empty list ? –  masterofdestiny Feb 5 '13 at 14:49

Your singleton pattern looks like it should work to me. Is is possible that since __init__ is being called both times, when you create a new instance, self._allsp gets reset making it appear that you have a new instance?

You can check to see if they are actually the same instance by putting:

print b is c

at the end of your script. (It'll print True if they're the same)

The simplest fix that I can think of is to make _allsp a class attribute and remove it from __init__. e.g.

class SMSMgr( object ):
    _instance = None
    _allsp = []
    def __init__(self):
        pass

Here is some tested code which creates a singleton as expected as I described above:

class SMSMgr( object ):
    _instance = None
    _allsp = []
    def __init__(self):
        pass

    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        if not cls._instance:
            cls._instance = super(SMSMgr, cls).__new__(
                                cls, *args, **kwargs)
        return cls._instance

    def foo(self,arg):
        self._allsp.append(arg)

    def bar(self):
        print self._allsp

a = SMSMgr()
a.foo(1)
b = SMSMgr()
b.foo(2)
a.bar()
b.bar()
print a is b
share|improve this answer
    
self._allsp.append(a) will give error –  masterofdestiny Feb 5 '13 at 14:45
    
@masterofdestiny -- did you try it? I don't think it will :-) –  mgilson Feb 5 '13 at 14:47
    
M sorry thanks it is working –  masterofdestiny Feb 5 '13 at 14:50
    
@masterofdestiny -- What error did it give you? –  mgilson Feb 5 '13 at 14:50
    
one more thing how to import it on other file oo = SMSMgr() print oo._allsp is returning empty list ? –  masterofdestiny Feb 5 '13 at 14:57

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