Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been working on a sqlite3 database with a Django project. I'm moving the project to the production environment where I use Postgres. I've used South, so I have all my migrations automated.

I'm running into the following error while trying to migrate the schema:

[05/Feb/2013 16:38:31] DEBUG [south:270] execute "ALTER TABLE "frontend_userprofile" ADD COLUMN "id" serial NULL PRIMARY KEY;" with params "[]"
FATAL ERROR - The following SQL query failed: ALTER TABLE "frontend_userprofile" ADD COLUMN "id" serial NULL PRIMARY KEY;
The error was: conflicting NULL/NOT NULL declarations for column "id" of table "frontend_userprofile"

[..]

django.db.utils.DatabaseError: conflicting NULL/NOT NULL declarations for column "id" of table "frontend_userprofile"

This is the relevant part of the migration file:

def forwards(self, orm):
    # Adding field 'UserProfile.id'
    db.add_column('frontend_userprofile', 'id',
                  self.gf('django.db.models.fields.AutoField')(default=None, primary_key=True, null=True),
                  keep_default=False)


    # Changing field 'UserProfile.user'
    db.alter_column('frontend_userprofile', 'user_id', self.gf('django.db.models.fields.related.OneToOneField')(to=orm['auth.User'], unique=True, null=True))

[..]

    'frontend.userprofile': {
        'Meta': {'object_name': 'UserProfile'},
        'company': ('django.db.models.fields.related.ForeignKey', [], {'default': 'None', 'to': "orm['frontend.Company']", 'null': 'True'}),
        'id': ('django.db.models.fields.AutoField', [], {'primary_key': 'True'}),
        'user': ('django.db.models.fields.related.OneToOneField', [], {'to': "orm['auth.User']", 'unique': 'True', 'null': 'True'})
    }

And of the model:

class UserProfile(models.Model):
    user    = models.OneToOneField(User, null=True, unique=True)
    company = models.ForeignKey(Company, null=True, default=None)

EDIT

As suggested by Jordan, you can't have both a null primary key, so the following changes solve this problem:

    db.add_column('frontend_userprofile', 'id',
                  self.gf('django.db.models.fields.AutoField')(default=None, primary_key=True),
                  keep_default=False)


class UserProfile(models.Model):
    user    = models.OneToOneField(User, unique=True)
    company = models.ForeignKey(Company, null=True, default=None)

But I still have a problem finishing the migration:

DEBUG [south:270] execute "ALTER TABLE "frontend_userprofile" ADD COLUMN "id" serial NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY;" with params "[]"
FATAL ERROR - The following SQL query failed: ALTER TABLE "frontend_userprofile" ADD COLUMN "id" serial NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY;
The error was: multiple primary keys for table "frontend_userprofile" are not allowed

django.db.utils.DatabaseError: multiple primary keys for table "frontend_userprofile" are not allowed

I think the reason is that in a previous migration user_id has been set to primary key and now it's trying to add id as primary key. Any help with this?

share|improve this question
2  
I know nothing about Python but in standard SQL a primary key column cannot be NULL. –  Álvaro G. Vicario Feb 5 '13 at 15:51
    
Alvaro is right and delete also unique=True because you are already use OneToOneField which understandable in Django –  catherine Feb 5 '13 at 15:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't have a NULL primary key, as far as i know. That would be bad.

I recommend removing the part that says Null=True in that migration and trying again.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, that solved he problem. Can you please take a look at my edit for another problem i'm facing? thanks. –  pistacchio Feb 5 '13 at 16:15
    
It seems these tables already exist? Your migration is out of sync with reality. Either you need to delete the column from the DB table or delete the line from your migration. Or, you can separate that line out to its own migration if it isn't already, and then update south_migrationhistory to say that it's been applied. –  Jordan Feb 5 '13 at 16:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.