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I saw the following post order traversal algorithm in some website... it seems to be correct. I just want to verify that this algorithm works correctly — is this algorithm correct for post order traversal without recursion?

void postOrderTraversal(Tree *root)
{
    node * previous = null;
    node * s = null;
    push(root);
    while( stack is not empty )
    {
        s = pop();

        if(s->right == null and s->left == null)
        {
            previous = s;
            process s;
        }
        else
        {
            if(s->right == previous or s->left == previous)
            {
                previous = s;
                process s;
            }
            else
            {
                push( s );
                if(s->right) { push(s->right); }
                if(s->left)  { push(s->left);  }
            }
        }
    }
}
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3  
Did you read the rest of the thread in Algogeeks? mail-archive.com/algogeeks@googlegroups.com/msg03546.html –  APC Sep 24 '09 at 12:29
    
It's not syntactically recursive because it is emulating recursion with PUSH and POP. –  RBarryYoung Sep 30 '09 at 17:44
1  
Barry, I would maintain that it's unnecessary even to qualify it with "emulating." –  Nietzche-jou Sep 30 '09 at 17:58
    
No, I think that it is necessary, because otherwise we get sucked down into the semantic tar-pit where we cannot tell the difference between "iterative" and "recursive", like half of the programmers in the world already have. –  RBarryYoung Oct 1 '09 at 3:56

3 Answers 3

no here prev should not start with null eg:for bst having nodes 5 2 1 3 7 6 8 0 it will not consider zero because at 1 its right is null and this time previous will also be null hence it will not consider its left child i.e. 0 write previous=any value but not null

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Try to write iterative versions of pre-order, in-order, and post-order binary traversal methods. You will then see the pattern or methodology of converting their corresponding recursive versions into the iterative versions.

Key point is sticking to some basic rules:
- Use node selection (e.g., currentNode = currentNode->Left before reiterating the loop, etc.) for immediate node traversal.
- Use stack to remember nodes that need to be visited or revisited later.
- If a node need to be "REvisited," detecting / keeping the state so that you can indicate whether the next node needs to be "processed" in next iteration or one of more of the child nodes should be visited before the node can be processed.

If you stick to these rules, you can esily accomplish the tasks.

Here is an example of the iterative post-order traversal. Ignore BinarySearchTree - it works for any binary trees.

    public static IEnumerator<BinarySearchTreeNode<T>> GetPostOrderTraverseEnumerator(BinarySearchTreeNode<T> root)
    {
        if (root == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("root");
        }

        Stack<BinarySearchTreeNode<T>> stack = new Stack<BinarySearchTreeNode<T>>();

        BinarySearchTreeNode<T> currentNode = root;

        // If the following flag is false, we need to visit the child nodes first
        // before we process the node.
        bool processNode = false;

        while (true)
        {
            // See if we need to visit child nodes first
            if (processNode != true)
            {
                if (currentNode.Left != null)
                {
                    // Remember to visit the current node later
                    stack.Push(currentNode);

                    if (currentNode.Right != null)
                    {
                        // Remember to visit the right child node later
                        stack.Push(currentNode.Right);
                    }

                    // Visit the left child
                    currentNode = currentNode.Left;
                    continue;
                }
                else if (currentNode.Right != null)
                {
                    // Remember to visit the current node later
                    stack.Push(currentNode);

                    // Visit the right child
                    currentNode = currentNode.Right;
                    continue;
                }
            }

            // Process current node
            yield return currentNode;

            // See if we are done.
            if (stack.Count == 0)
            {
                break;
            }

            // Get next node to visit from the stack
            BinarySearchTreeNode<T> previousNode = currentNode;
            currentNode = stack.Pop();

            // See if the next node should be processed or not
            // This can be determined by the fact that either of the current node's child nodes
            // has just been processed now.
            processNode = (previousNode == currentNode.Left || previousNode == currentNode.Right);
        }
    }
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Here is the working code

Stack s=new Stack();
    while(true){
       if(root!=null){
           s.push(root);
           root=root.left;
       }
       else{
            if(s.top().right==NULL){
               root=s.top();
               s.pop();
               System.out.println(root.data);
               if(root==s.top().right){
                    System.out.println(s.top().data);
                    s.pop();
               }
            }
       if(!s.empty())
          root=s.top().right;
       else 
          root=NULL;

       }
    }
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will fail for this input. 3 \ 2 \ 1 I remember I saw this code in some book .. :-/ –  Rohit Mar 16 '13 at 20:03

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