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Most of my UIKit Dispose overrides do something with other views before they get destroyed:

protected override void Dispose (bool disposing)
{
    if (ScrollView != null) {
        ScrollView.RemoveObserver (this, new NSString ("contentOffset"));
        ScrollView.RemoveObserver (this, new NSString ("contentInset"));
        ScrollView = null;
    }

    base.Dispose (disposing);
}

I just recently realized that Dispose will run on finalizer thread if disposing is false.
In this case ScrollView.RemoveObserver will be called from non-UI thread which is Bad.

What's the safe way to do UIKit-related cleanup in Dispose?

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Just checking - will run on finalizer thread if disposing is true should read false? – Stuart Feb 5 '13 at 17:35
    
@Stuart Yup, thanks. – Dan Abramov Feb 5 '13 at 19:10
up vote 4 down vote accepted

If disposing is false, then you would probably be better off not calling that code.

protected override void Dispose (bool disposing)
{
    if (disposing)
    {
        if (ScrollView != null) {
            ScrollView.RemoveObserver (this, new NSString ("contentOffset"));
            ScrollView.RemoveObserver (this, new NSString ("contentInset"));
            ScrollView = null;
        }
    }
    base.Dispose (disposing);
}

As a more general answer to your question - assuming this code is in a UIViewController - it might be better to attach/detach these observers inside ViewDidAppear, ViewDidDisappear - then you can avoid this issue altogether.

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Thanks for answer. This is inside a custom view, I assume I could move this to RemoveFromSuperview then. – Dan Abramov Feb 5 '13 at 17:15

Adam Kemp posted a great explanation in a mirror thread on Xamarin forums.

Only if disposing is true should you do any of that work. If it's false then you're being called from a finalizer and so it's not safe to access that other object. The only things you should access in that case would be any unmanaged resources (like an IntPtr which stores a native allocation you need to free or a native thread you need to kill).

This obviously brings up the question of when to do the work you're currently doing there. If you're in a view controller then you could use a method like WillDisappear. If you are in a view then you could just use WillMoveToWindow (which gets called with null as the window if you are being removed from the window).

Another important bit regarding ReleaseDesignerOutlets:

You can't call ReleaseDesignerOutlets when called from a finalizer either. Remember, it is not safe to look at any other managed objects referenced by your object in your finalizer. Those objects may no longer exist.

This is safe to skip because each of those other objects already has a similar finalizer. If you never get around to calling Dispose() on them then they will have their finalizers called from the finalizer thread, and in that case their own finalizer will call their own Dispose(bool) with a false, which means "you're being called from a finalizer". Since the native object is an unmanaged resource (just an IntPtr) it is safe for their Dispose(bool) method to release the reference to those native resources to allow those native objects to leave memory.

You can actually use the assembly browser to look at what NSObject's Finalize and Dispose(bool) methods do to verify what I just described. Whatever you do, never access your managed resources from within a finalizer, which means never access them from Dispose(bool) when the disposing argument is false.

Thanks Adam!

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Could you use

InvokeOnMainThread(delegate {....})

to kill the UIKit stuff? Not 100% sure it'd do what you want, but thats the normal way of doing UIKit stuff when you might be on / are on a different thread.

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I'm not sure it would be safe though. – Dan Abramov Feb 6 '13 at 12:31

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