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I'd like to think I'm fairly decent at reviewing other peoples code...but I am at a loss. This comes from the Doom3 Math library. I believe this has probably existed in GPL since Quake 1. Note that this does reference math.h. I'm guessing there is some way that this actually computes a cosine...but I cannot figure it out. Anyone explain?

    ID_INLINE float idMath::Cos16( float a ) {
    float s, d;

    if ( ( a < 0.0f ) || ( a >= TWO_PI ) ) {
        a -= floorf( a / TWO_PI ) * TWO_PI;
    }
#if 1
    if ( a < PI ) {
        if ( a > HALF_PI ) {
            a = PI - a;
            d = -1.0f;
        } else {
            d = 1.0f;
        }
    } else {
        if ( a > PI + HALF_PI ) {
            a = a - TWO_PI;
            d = 1.0f;
        } else {
            a = PI - a;
            d = -1.0f;
        }
    }
#else
    a = PI - a;
    if ( fabs( a ) >= HALF_PI ) {
        a = ( ( a < 0.0f ) ? -PI : PI ) - a;
        d = 1.0f;
    } else {
        d = -1.0f;
    }
#endif
    s = a * a;
    return d * ( ( ( ( ( -2.605e-07f * s + 2.47609e-05f ) * s - 1.3888397e-03f ) * s + 4.16666418e-02f ) * s - 4.999999963e-01f ) * s + 1.0f );
}
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5  
Let this be an example of why people should comment their code –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 5 '13 at 17:41
    
a p o c w s l v n –  Martin James Feb 5 '13 at 17:55
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit, s/code/math code/ :P –  Griwes Feb 5 '13 at 17:56
    
If you think that's confusing, look at the fast inverse square root from Quake 3. –  interjay Feb 5 '13 at 18:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

All the conditional stuff looks like it's folding the angle down to a single quadrant (or maybe octant, I can't be bothered to figure it out... ;) ), and recording a correction factor (d).

The last line is performing some kind of 10th-order polynomial approximation (maybe Taylor or Chebyshev?).* But it's only working on even powers, as cos is an even function. It's also using Horner's method to avoid directly calculating large powers multiple times.

It's then re-applying the correct sign using d.


* To see that this is "quite" accurate, try running the following code in Octave (you can do it online e.g. here):

% One quadrant
a = (-pi/2):0.1:(+pi/2);

% Exact result
y_exact = cos(a);

% Our approximation
s = a .* a;
y_approx = (((((-2.605e-07 .* s + 2.47609e-05) .* s - 1.3888397e-03) .* s + 4.16666418e-02) .* s - 4.999999963e-01) .* s + 1);

% Plot
hold on
plot(a, y_exact,  'b')
plot(a, y_approx, 'r')

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Are you ever going to stop editing this answer? –  Mark Ransom Feb 5 '13 at 17:48
    
@MarkRansom: At some point ;) –  Oliver Charlesworth Feb 5 '13 at 17:49

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