Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What I want to do is:

>STRIPPER='sed s/admin_editable=\"[01]\"// | sed s/runtime_editable=\"[01]\"//'
>cat file.txt | $STRIPPER > stripped.txt  

i.e. define a shell variable which is a pipeline of multiple commands (mine happen to be sed's), that I can then call later. I'm doing this from the command line now, but may ultimately put it into a script.

I've tried both ' and " for enclosing the command neither works.

sed: can't read |: No such file or directory
sed: can't read sed: No such file or directory
sed: can't read s/admin_editable=\"[01]\"//: No such file or directory
sed: can't read |sed: No such file or directory
sed: can't read s/runtime_editable=\"[01]\"//: No such file or directory
sed: can't read |: No such file or directory

I know that there is probably a single regex that could handle this case, but I'd like to know how to do the pipeline in general.

share|improve this question
    
Pipelines are part of the shell's grammar, and as such are recognized before any parameter expansion takes place. –  chepner Feb 5 '13 at 18:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is a great place to use a function rather than a variable.

stripper() {
    sed s/admin_editable="[01]"// | sed s/runtime_editable="[01]"//
}

cat file.txt | stripper > stripped.txt  

You could also eliminate the useless use of cat:

stripper < file.txt > stripped.txt 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.