Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Example 1:

int length()  
{  
        return strlen(random_string);  
}

Example 2:

int length()  
{  
        int str_length = 0;  
        str_length = strlen(random_string);  
        return str_length;  
}  

Question:
I have come across many functions where a single line of code could satisfy the requisite for that function, but I recall something about avoiding this kind of shortcut.

Are there certain situations where one is more appropriate than another or should I always go for the simpler piece of code.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Lightness Races in Orbit, Bo Persson, ybungalobill, Sudarshan, Sankar Ganesh Feb 6 '13 at 6:15

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
To a decent compiler, that should not make any difference. Choose whatever comes more readable or maintainable to you. –  Andy Prowl Feb 5 '13 at 18:50
1  
@AndyProwl: Yet, NRVO.... –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 5 '13 at 18:51
    
It's better to do multi-line statements if the function performs multiple operations, and the possibility of the implementation changing is not zero. –  Shmiddty Feb 5 '13 at 18:52
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: Wouldn't the compiler elide the copy in any case? –  Andy Prowl Feb 5 '13 at 18:54
    
@AndyProwl: Maybe, if it can still do RVO. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 5 '13 at 19:08

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One reason to have a a multi-step approach is that if you ever decide to add a line to print the value of length, it's a lot less hassle:

int length()
{
    const int str_length = strlen(something);
    printf("str_length = %d\n", str_length);
    return str_length;
}

Or if you want to add some extra assert:

int length()
{
    const int str_length = strlen(something);
    assert(str_length >= 0);
    return str_length;
}

Other than that, it's all about what you feel is most appropriate [unless you have strict coding standards to follow, of course!]

share|improve this answer
1  
You forgot the const! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 5 '13 at 19:04

I would never go for your second example, because the initialisation-then-assignment is just taking up space for no reason.

What I might do is the following:

int length()  
{  
    const int str_length = strlen(arbitrary_string);  
    return str_length;  
}

This is for two reasons:

  1. You allow your compiler to perform the Named Return-Value Optimisation; and
  2. Your return value is now self-documenting by virtue of having a name.

However, that's more of a default rule for me.

In this specific, actual case:

  1. Your return type is only a measly little int, so the Named Return-Value Optimisation isn't permitted anyway, and would be largely pointless even if it were; and
  2. The function is already trivial and appropriately-named.

So I'd be using the first example:

int length()  
{  
    return strlen(arbitrary_string);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
One other advantage: It can make debugging easier when you can see what value the code is producing before you return it. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 5 '13 at 18:56
2  
Would example 2 actually prevent NRVO? "in a return statement in a function with a class return type, when the expression is the name of a non-volatile automatic object (other than a function or catch-clause parameter) with the same cv-unqualified type as the function return type, the copy/move operation can be omitted by constructing the automatic object directly into the function's return value" –  Joseph Mansfield Feb 5 '13 at 18:57
    
@Lightness is your 2nd code is more optimized then 1st one or both are same. ? –  Arpit Feb 5 '13 at 19:01
    
@sftrabbit: Well, the expression isn't a name, so yes :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 5 '13 at 19:03
    
@JerryCoffin: Very true –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 5 '13 at 19:03

I say always go with example 1. It reads much more nicely. I would only ever not put the expression in the return statement if the intermediate variable name aided readability or if the expression ought to be split into multiple statements.

I would never suggestion example 2, though - the initialisation to 0 is pointless. The middle ground is better:

int length()  
{  
    int str_length = strlen(random_string);  
    return str_length;  
}

However, it's clear that str_length doesn't tell you any more than the function name strlen does.

share|improve this answer

In general code should be easy to read and make the purpose clear. In your example I would prefer the shorter version. There is no additional information gain about the semantics with the long version.

As always there may be exceptions. Especially when the returned value arises from a long and complicted expression. Then it might be helpful to name some of the intermediate results.

share|improve this answer

To answer this question always choose the easier to read solution, this is important in every programming language but it's extremely important in C++.

For your particular question the easiest to read for a C++ developer is the option number 1, it is clean and simple. BUT if it happens that the single line you have to write is like:

return (classA *)(function1(data1)->function2())->function3();

In this cases allways choose to split the line, because even if you understand what it does right now, you can have a hard time to figure out what's happening in there in the future.

Hope it helps

share|improve this answer
1  
That bad example is also terrible to debug, mostly because debuggers tend to "think" in lines (mostly), e.g. I haven't seen a debugger where you can put a breakpoint somewhere in the middle of a line. –  Maarten Bodewes Feb 5 '13 at 19:05

In most cases, readability always trumps performance. If you are having performance-critical code, then go for performance. However, that is an exception, rather than the rule.

Always go for readability.

share|improve this answer
    
Always go for readability yes, but this present example the first one have actually a better readability. Of course I'll not return 300 characters line to win some space. –  Marc Simon Feb 5 '13 at 18:58

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.