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What is the purpose of using interfaces for domain entities?

In our project, we are using interface for domain entities. Inside the interface, there are only getter and setter methods, not even any domain logic.

Is using an interface for entities like this useful? Is this good practice?

Thanks.

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We can't answer why your project has made a particular decision. Ask your colleagues. –  Jon Skeet Feb 5 '13 at 18:53
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I'm asking in general. –  magicbacon Feb 5 '13 at 18:54
    
In general it's a poor idea. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Feb 5 '13 at 18:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are plenty of reasons why it's a good idea sometimes but it really depends on the scope of the project.

First of all: your statement "...not even any domain logic." doesn't make sense, there can't be any logic in an interface, interfaces can't have any logic, only method signatures.

The main reason why this is done is to support multiple implementations of the domain objects for different uses.

Reasons why you might want to code your domain objects to interfaces:

  1. Serialization - sometimes you want to create serializable versions of your domain objects but don't want to mix that code up with the code you use for your core app. For example, you might have an implementation of your Person object that you just use to serialize to JSON for your webapp.

  2. Shared API - you might want to distribute a public API version of your code that has different implementations of your objects, or you might even just want to make the interfaces available to another group (or client, or vendor)

  3. Support for a legacy implementation - maybe you have some data in an old database that you need to build a connector for that involves a different implementation of your domain objects to pull the data out.

  4. Testing - having interfaces for your core classes makes unit testing a lot easier since you can quickly stub out methods you don't need for testing.

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You misunderstand OP, when he said interface has no domain logic, he meant there is no business logic in the contract of those interfaces. Not only is he correct, that is an excellent point to make. –  Marko Topolnik Feb 5 '13 at 20:20
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Domain objects rarely have any business logic in them, that's good design, but he said "no domain logic" not "no business logic". Either way, I stand by my reasons for this being good design in many cases, but certainly not all. –  Rick Mangi Feb 5 '13 at 20:23
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Pretty sure I explained why. Maybe you don't agree, and that's fine, but I've found it VERY useful in many cases as I laid out above. At the end of the day it depends on what your system is being used for obviously. And the interface does specify a contract, for what sort of data is being stored in the object... that's a contract. –  Rick Mangi Feb 5 '13 at 20:32
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Your point #4 about testing: you test getters and setters? It's like testing the postfix increment operator, just to make sure your JVM has it right. –  Marko Topolnik Feb 5 '13 at 20:56
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No, the point on testing is that you might have a complex domain object that you don't want to use for testing a collaborator that needs it. Sometimes it's easier to just mock up a domain object from an interface to use in its place, especially if there is some complex domain/business logic in there. –  Rick Mangi Feb 5 '13 at 20:59
  • I have never worked on a project where this kind of thing goes on;
  • it is not typical design;
  • I have never heard or read anyone claiming it is a good practice;
  • I can't think of any benefit from such a design;
  • I can think of nuisances it causes.

When you access a public instance field of a data object, you are already "programming to contract"—that's all the contract you get from a bean. The layer of accessors adds nothing, let alone another layer of interface. Java Beans are an admission of the fact that much data is just that – data – and encapsulating it behind a contract only hurts its utility. FP, probably the nicest programming paradigm in existence, got this point right.

One may ask (it's @pst, actually :), what if different entities implement different serialization strategies? What if they store data differently internally? Perhaps one is super-duper-over-clever and does lots of bit-twiddling for "performance" reasons.

Yes, we can certainly imagine some scenario where this is actually called for, but it goes the other way around: first you realize you'll be doing such a project, then you introduce interfaces around beans. You don't do it up front because "maybe, just maybe, this crazy requirement will come about in the middle of our project". And practice clearly shows that this almost never happens.

Also, don't forget that constructors are out of question in such a design. Enforcing a project-wide policy to write abstract factories for each and every piece of domain data—and for no definite reason—is definitely not what one could call a reasonable design choice.

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Can expand on some of the points? –  user166390 Feb 5 '13 at 18:57
    
@pst Which one are you interested in? The negatives hardly lend themselves to expansion :) –  Marko Topolnik Feb 5 '13 at 19:18
    
I am fairly interested in #5 (nuisances, as the bold drew my eye), but it would also be nice if some "common benefits of interfaces" could be ruled/reasoned-against in #4. (I mean, after all, isn't "programming to contract" a Good Thing?) –  user166390 Feb 5 '13 at 19:25
    
@pst When you access a public instance field of a data object, you are already "programming to contract"---that's all the contract you get from a bean. The layer of accessors adds nothing, let alone another layer of interface. Java Beans are an admission of the fact that much data is just that -- data -- and encapsulating it behind a contract only hurts its utility. FP, probably the nicest programming paradigm in existence, got it right. –  Marko Topolnik Feb 5 '13 at 20:18
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@pst Did that. Thanks for engaging feedback :) –  Marko Topolnik Feb 5 '13 at 20:49

I have seen some developers who take the "code to an interface" advice way too far. They think they should always be using an interface just in case it might come in handy one day.

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Even "plain" JavaBeans are a questionable practice, especially in today's world of aspects that can advise field access. Wrapping them in another layer of abstraction is... masochistic. Masochism was a general trend in Java in the mid 2000's, to be fair, but those years are luckily behind us. –  Marko Topolnik Feb 5 '13 at 19:22
    
@MarkoTopolnik No, no. Unfortunately Java still has lot of market share - and has done little to improve the fundamental language :( While some of the Beans-Are-Everything nonsense has died, this just means it's "less painful", which is different than "non painful". (This thought was spawned from my dislike of when a company claims to have an "Environmentally Friendly" product - in most cases the correct label is "Less Environmentally Damaging".) –  user166390 Feb 5 '13 at 19:29
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@pst I'm referring to much more modest goals: the recent trend trend in Java has been finding ways to reduce boilerplate, as opposed to previously, where the trend was to increase boilerplate. –  Marko Topolnik Feb 5 '13 at 19:58
    
@MarkoTopolnik Well, there isn't much I can say to that, so have a (tiny) +1 instead. –  user166390 Feb 5 '13 at 20:22

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