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** See updates first as original implemenation contains some false assumptions

Backstory

I have a problem where I MUST fork the processes, the reason is that I am using the jni and the single threaded R process. Also I need a way to monitor memory and cpu, forking seems like the only real solution. You cannot implement have more than one R invocation per process, I have definitly tried to get around this limitation but am pretty sure it is not possible due to the rinside setup method.

Current implementation

I am currently trying to fork a process and connect an rmi connection to it and store these in a stacked pool. The problem is that the registry.bind() method is not blocking as it should. When binding to the registry in a main process the process will block and wait for remote method calls but when starting from a RunTime.getRuntime().exec() the process does not block and exits. This causes my endpoint daemon to close and I receive socket errors when trying to communicate with the daemon. I am using the gfork library to fork my process simply for ability to receive exceptions and such on startup of the forked process.

public class JRIDaemon  implements IROperationRemoteProvider, Serializable, Runnable {

    /**
     * Serialization Id
     */
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 2279972098306474322L;

    /**
     * Daemon logger
     */
    private static final Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(JRIDaemon.class.getName());

    /**
     * This is the exeuctor service used to execute our job, the option for
     * newSingleThreadExecutor is important because R is single threaded and JRI
     * puts check in and will kill us if the thread is manipulated.
     */
    private static ExecutorService executorService = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();

    /**
     * This implemenation uses the exeuctor service to run the analytics
     * operation. The executor service is used because R is single threaded and
     * cannot be called from outside.
     */
    private JRIExecutionTask callableOperation;

    /**
     * This is the unique id that can to fetch this daemon.
     */
    private final String daemonId;


    private JRIDaemon() {
        this(UUID.randomUUID().toString());
    }

    private JRIDaemon(String daemonId) {
        this.daemonId = daemonId;
    }


    private String getDaemonId() {
        return daemonId;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        logger.info("Starting the jri daemon");

        System.out.println("Starting the jri daemon");
        try {
            IROperationRemoteProvider stub = (IROperationRemoteProvider) UnicastRemoteObject.exportObject(this, 0);

            Registry registry = LocateRegistry.getRegistry();
            registry.rebind(daemonId, stub);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            throw new RuntimeException("Exception occurred when initializing the rmi agent ", e);
        }
        System.out.println("Daemon is done");
        logger.fine("Exiting JRIDaemon#run");
    }

    /**
     * Close the connection to R services.
     * @throws NotBoundException 
     * @throws RemoteException 
     * @throws AccessException 
     */
    public void close() throws Exception {
        logger.info("Calling close !!!!!!!!!");
        //if (registry != null) {
        //    registry.unbind(daemonId);
        //}
        //System.exit(0);
    }

    /**
     * @see IROperationProvider#execute(IAnalyticsOperation, List, List)
     */
    @Override
    public Map<String, IMetric> execute(IAnalyticsOperation operation, List<IAnalyticsOperationInput> inputs, List<? extends IDataProvider> dataProvider) throws Exception {
        callableOperation = new JRIExecutionTask(inputs, operation, dataProvider);
        Future<Map<String, IMetric>> execution = executorService.submit((Callable<Map<String, IMetric>>) callableOperation);
        return execution.get();
    }

    /**
     * @see IROperationProvider#interrupt()
     * 
     *      TODO come to a solution on stopping and restarting the thread in the
     *      Rengine implementation.
     */
    @Override
    public void interrupt() {
        System.out.println("Calling interrupt on executor service");
        executorService.shutdown();
        // Can't do this yet because it causes a segfault in the task engine
        // process.
        // callableOperation.interrupt();
    }

    @Override
    public Boolean isAllGood() {
        return true;
    }

    @Override
    public void activate() {
    }

    @Override
    public void passivate() {

    }

    /**
     * This is here only for testing purposes.
     * @param args
     * @throws Exception
     */
    public static void main(String args[] ) throws Exception {
        IROperationRemoteProvider provider = create();
        Thread.sleep(10000);
        System.out.println(" ALL GOOD " + provider.isAllGood());

    }


    /**
     * This creates a daemon and initializes returns the client that can be used
     * to talk to the server. The daemon is useless for the calling process as
     * it is a separate process and we use the client to communicate with the
     * jri daemon process.
     * 
     * @return
     */
    public static IROperationRemoteProvider create() throws Exception {
        LocateRegistry.createRegistry(1099);
        String daemonId = UUID.randomUUID().toString();

        JRIDaemon daemon = new JRIDaemon(daemonId);
        Fork<JRIDaemon, org.gfork.types.Void> forkedDaemon = new Fork<JRIDaemon, org.gfork.types.Void>(daemon);

        //forkedDaemon.setJvmOptions("-Djava.security.manager -Djava.security.policy=\"taskenginesecurity.policy\"");

        logger.info("Calling run task");
        forkedDaemon.addListener(new Listener<JRIDaemon, org.gfork.types.Void>() {

            @Override
            public void onFinish(Fork<JRIDaemon, Void> fork, boolean wasKilled) throws IllegalAccessException, InterruptedException {

                logger.info("Task is finished exit value -> " + fork.getExitValue() + " killed ->" + wasKilled);

            }

            @Override
            public void onError(Fork<JRIDaemon, Void> fork) throws IllegalAccessException, InterruptedException {
                logger.info("Error was " + fork.getStdErr());
            }

            @Override
            public void onException(Fork<JRIDaemon, Void> fork) throws IllegalAccessException, InterruptedException, IOException, ClassNotFoundException {
                logger.log(Level.SEVERE, " Erorro occurred in daemon ", fork.getException());
            } 
        });

        Fork.setLoggingEnabled(true);

        forkedDaemon.execute();

        forkedDaemon.waitFor();

        logger.info("Standard out was " + forkedDaemon.getStdOut());

        if (forkedDaemon.isException()) {
            throw new RuntimeException("Unble to create Remote Provider ", forkedDaemon.getException());
        }

       //Thread.sleep(2000);

        Registry registry = LocateRegistry.getRegistry();

        IROperationRemoteProvider process = (IROperationRemoteProvider) registry.lookup(daemonId);

        return process;
    }
}

I use the create method to create a new implementation of my analytics provider, the Fork class calls run when it executes to spawn a new daemon. If I put this exact same code in a public static void main(String[] args) the process daemonizes and waits for rmi calls, but when exeting through the for operation it does not.

Here is the Gfrork execute method and you can see it uses the Runtime.exec

/**
     * Starts a new java process which runs the task. 
     * The subprocess inherits the environment including class path an
     * system properties of the current process. The JVM is launched using
     * executable derived from standard system property 'java.home'.
     * <p>
     * Standard output (System.out) of the task can be red by {@link #getStdOut()} or
     * forwarded to a file, see {@link #setStdOutWriter(Writer)}.
     * The same is possible for Standard error (System.err), 
     * see {@link #getStdErr()} and {@link #setStdErrWriter(Writer)}.
     * 
     * @throws Exception
     */
    public synchronized void execute() throws Exception {
        if (isExecuting()) {
            throw new IllegalStateException(FORK_IS_ALREADY_EXECUTING);
        }
        exec = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(createCmdArray(), null, workingDir);

        taskStdOutReader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(exec.getInputStream()));
        taskErrorReader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(exec.getErrorStream()));
        readError();
        readStdOut();

        waitForFinishedThread = new Thread("jforkWaitForFinishedThread") {
            // needed to notify listeners after execution
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    waitFor();
                } catch (final Exception e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                    stdErrText.append(String.format("ERROR jforkListenerNotifier: %s%n", e.toString()));
                }
            }
        };
        waitForFinishedThread.start();
    }

I have added sleep timers to watch for the process , it does start and shortly after that it exits with no errors and a 0 status. I have verified that if there is a problem configuring rmi in the run method that it will return the exception. RMI seems to be initializing correctly but simply does not block so that the forked process does not exit. I have RTFM on Runtime.exec and have not idea what is causing this to exit. Any help would be appreciated.

Update

Thank you EJP even though your remarks were condescending they were correct. I made an incorrect assumption that the bind was blocking due to the fact that the process did not die but this is rather that it creates a separate thread to handle rmi communication. This is what keeps the process alive.

import java.rmi.Remote;
import java.rmi.RemoteException;
import java.rmi.registry.LocateRegistry;
import java.rmi.registry.Registry;
import java.rmi.server.UnicastRemoteObject;


public class RunnableRMIDaemon implements Remote {


        public static void main(String args[]) throws InterruptedException {
            String daemonID = "123";
            System.out.println("STARTING");
            Registry registry;
            try {
                RunnableRMIDaemon daemon = new RunnableRMIDaemon();
                registry = LocateRegistry.getRegistry();
                final Remote stub = (Remote) UnicastRemoteObject.exportObject(daemon, 0);
                registry.rebind(daemonID, stub);


                Thread.sleep(1000);

            } catch (RemoteException e) {
                throw new RuntimeException("Remote Exception occurred while running " + e);
            } 
            System.out.println("ENDING");
        }
    }



import java.io.IOException;

public class ForkRMIDaemon {

    public static void main(String args[]) throws IOException, InterruptedException {
        System.out.println("Starting fork");
        Runtime.getRuntime().exec("java -cp . RunnableRMIDaemon");
        Thread.sleep(10000);
        System.out.println("Completed fork");
    }
}

When the first process dies the Runtime.getRuntime().exec() process is still alive.

thanatos:testingrmifork chris$ java ForkRMIDaemon
Starting fork
Completed fork
tv-mini:testingrmifork chris$ ps -ef | grep java
  501 25499     1   0   0:00.10 ttys007    0:00.72 /usr/bin/java -cp . RunnableRMIDaemon
  501 25501 25413   0   0:00.00 ttys007    0:00.00 grep java
thanatos:testingrmifork chris$ 

My investigation is not complete yet but it appears the the simple gfork library is actually doing something to close the process on return. I have looked through the gfork code but have not seen where this can be happening.

Thanks EJP and I applogize of the incorrect information. I am guessing that gfork is doing some trickery because it allows you to call a method that is not main.

I assumed that java treated threads more like c pthreads and I have always had to create a while loop in main() otherwise my threads would be killed when main exits. My mistake

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by EJP, Kate Gregory, nfechner, bmargulies, Brent Worden Feb 6 '13 at 18:25

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Why fork at all? Why not just start the RMI server in this JVM and avoid the whole problem? –  EJP Feb 5 '13 at 23:48
    
I need to process multiple R scripts at a time on the same box. This cannot be done without a fork due to R's single threaded nature and the ability to call int rinit() only once inside the jni code. I tried adding monitors to make the c code thread safe but was going stopped when I realized that I was going to essentially have to make R multithreaded :) My other reason is that I need to set limits on cpu and memory and due to the fact that the only way to do this in multithreaded is to profile the objects this was going to limit me also. My only choice is to use forked processes. –  Chris Hinshaw Feb 6 '13 at 0:01
    
So you have to fork lots of these RMI JVMs? So how come they all bind to the Registry using the same bind-name? All but the most recent binding will disappear, as you are using rebind(). –  EJP Feb 6 '13 at 0:06
    
I am using a uuid to when binding, the example above does not show this. I add a uuid to the constructor and this is used as the daemonid when binding to the registry. In the create function I return the bound impl from the registry lookup(daemonId); –  Chris Hinshaw Feb 6 '13 at 0:08
    
Maybe using rforge.net/Rserve is better for your needs? –  eckes Jan 2 at 12:22

2 Answers 2

The problem is that the registry.bind() method is not blocking as it should. When binding to the registry in a main process the process will block and wait for remote method calls.

No it won't. This is fantasy. You made it up. There is nothing in the documentation that says anything of the sort. It is not a blocking call (except for the moments during which it is communicating with the Registry); and it does not 'block and wait for remote method calls'. It returns to your code. You mustn't be surprised if you make up behaviour and the system doesn't exhibit it.

This causes my endpoint daemon to close

No it doesn't. Your endpoint daemon causes itself to close, somehow. RMI starts non-daemon threads to handle incoming connections, so a JVM that has exported remote objects won't exit until those remote objects are unexported, either explicitly or via GC, or the application calls System.exit(). The way to prevent GC of your remote objects is to store static references to them.

I must say I don't understand why you are even exec-ing a sub-process, if all you are going to do in the main process is wait for it.

share|improve this answer

Came up with a semi dirty way to do it, this will block indefinitely but I will have to find a sure fire way to close the forked daemon, in a normal environment the process should get a sigkill as when I am running it form unit tests. I think I am almost there.

@Override
public void run() {
    logger.info("Starting the jri daemon");

    Registry registry;
    try {
        registry = LocateRegistry.getRegistry();
        final IROperationRemoteProvider stub = (IROperationRemoteProvider) UnicastRemoteObject.exportObject(this, 0);
        registry.rebind(daemonId, stub);
    } catch (RemoteException e) {
        throw new RuntimeException("Remote Exception occurred while running " + e);
    }

    final Object waitObj = new Object();

    synchronized (waitObj) {
        while (!closed)
            try {
                waitObj.wait();
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                closed = true;
            }
    }
    logger.fine("Exiting JRIDaemon#run");
}
share|improve this answer
    
You don't need this. Your process shouldn't exit as long as the object remains bound, but you could help it by storing a static reference to the remote object. –  EJP Feb 5 '13 at 22:51
    
After investigation this is correct and my early assumption is that gfork is doing some trickery to execute a method outside of main. This is almost assuredly causing my threads to die. Should have done better tests before jumping to conclusions. My sample code from above proves that you are correct that the forked process will not die when started using Runtime.getRuntime().exec() –  Chris Hinshaw Feb 6 '13 at 0:03

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