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Is it possible to provide hints to the Include linq queries so that the joining of the child tables can be optimized ?

I have a very generic data model and so, there are multiple referential constraints between tables. I am working with a legacy system, so changing that around would be very difficult.

I have a query like the following, which generates very complicated SQL queries.

var links = A.B.CreateSourceQuery()
                            .Include("B1")
                            .Include("B1.C1")
                            .Include("B1.D1")
                            .ToArray();

Is there a way to provide hints to the above query, on how to join the respective child entities, so that the SQL generated is more optimized and efficient and the data can be eager loaded.

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1 Answer 1

See my post at http://www.thinqlinq.com/Post.aspx/Title/LINQ-to-Database-Performance-hints particularly the point around breaking up complex queries. In the case where you're fetching two sets of grandchildren, your performance may well suffer. You may want to consider a custom projection instead of multiple includes.

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Thanks for your reply, Jim. I was trying to write custom projections by manually joining B1 with B and C1 with B1 and D1 with B1, but since it is a model first design and the associations are independent (i.e. not based on keys), I dont have access to the joining columns as properties of the entity. I'm not sure how I can write a custom projection if I cant join based on entity properties (i.e. when the properties are not available on the entities). I'll try breaking the complex queries and see if that helps. –  Ishpal Feb 6 '13 at 15:05

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