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I have text file which has tab-delimited columns in following format:

fileName    Type    sc1 sc2 sc3 sc4 sc5 sc6
file1   abc 0   0.2 0   0   0   0
file1   xyz 0   0.8 0   0   0.8 0.2
file2   abc 0.5 0   0   0.1 0   0
file2   xyz 0   0   0   0.7 0.003   0.1
file3   abc 0.002   0   0   0   0.04    0
file3   xyz 0.5 0   0   0   0   0.3
.
. 

First row is the header row. sc1, sc2, sc3 etc are score 1, score 2, score 3 (they are not all zeros)

There are more than two types and each file has same number of types.

How to know the fileName which has lowest sc6 for xyz type? or how to create another text file from this file, which will have filename and sc6 for all xyz type?

I really don't want to load this as a db or do something like that. I was wondering if I can accomplish this rather quickly using Unix's cut , sort or grep commands. Any perl, awk solution acceptable too.

Let me know if the question is not very clear.

P.S. Please feel free to suggest different heading for this question. This is the best I could come up with.

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What have you tried? –  TLP Feb 5 '13 at 19:43
    
I tried using grep and cut, but not getting much out them. I will post if I start to get something meaningful. If none can answer here, as a last resort, I will go use db. –  Watt Feb 5 '13 at 19:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
awk -v lowest=9999999 '$2 == "xyz" && $8 < lowest { lowest = $8; lowfile = $1 }
                       END {print lowfile, "\t", lowest}' infile

or:

awk '$2 == "xyz"' infile | sort -k 8n | head -1 | cut -f1,8

To create a file with just filename and sc6 for all xyz:

awk '$2 = "xyz" {print $1, "\t", $8}' infile > outfile
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+1 for third awk statement. But, I tried second one it gives just one entry in output.txt I did this awk '$2 == "xyz"' infile.txt | sort -k 8n | head -1 | cut -f1,8 > output.txt –  Watt Feb 5 '13 at 20:13
    
The first two only get the lowest value. That's what you said you wanted: "How to know the fileName which has lowest sc6 for xyz type" –  Barmar Feb 5 '13 at 20:14
    
ah.. my bad, if it is not too much trouble, can you tweak it to print maybe top 10 lowest or print in order of lowest first for all the files. Actually, the first one prints just 0 score one, that is not very helpful for my analysis. –  Watt Feb 5 '13 at 20:20
    
Change head -1 to head -10 to get the top 10. Changing the first solution is more complicated, I'd just go with the second. –  Barmar Feb 5 '13 at 20:21
    
Great! It worked like a charm. You saved lot my time. Many thanks! –  Watt Feb 5 '13 at 20:24

You can do a one-liner like this:

perl -lanwe 'next unless $F[1] eq "xyz"; 
             $a{$F[0]}{$F[1]} = $F[7]; 
             }{ 
             for my $file (sort { $a{$b}{xyz} <=> $a{$a}{xyz} } keys %a) { 
                 print qq($file : $a{$file}{xyz}); }'

Autosplit -a will split on whitespace into array @F, while reading from stdin or argument file name (-n switch). After end of input (}{ "operator") the stored results are sorted and printed. Will skip all types except "xyz".

Input and output:

file1   abc 0   0   0   0   0   0
file1   xyz 0   0   0   0   0   0
file2   abc 0   0   0   0   0   0
file2   xyz 0   0   0   0   0   0
file3   abc 0   0   0   0   0   0
file4   xyz 0   0   0   0   0   1

file4 : 1
file2 : 0
file1 : 0

Note: I had to add a line to the input to see that it actually sorts. What dreadful sample data for something that requires sorting!

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for sample data. I updated the sample data to represent what actually in the file. –  Watt Feb 5 '13 at 20:07
    
+1 for detailed solution. –  Watt Feb 5 '13 at 20:25

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