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I'm trying to achieve the following indentation in emacs:

class A
{
    // I ALWAYS use access labels in classes

    public: // access-label
        int member; // inclass
};

struct B
{
    // I NEVER use access labels in structs

    int member; // inclass
};

However with the following configuration file...

(defun my-cpp-mode ()
  "My C++ mode"
  (c++-mode)
  (c-set-style "K&R")
  (setq c-basic-offset 4)
  (c-set-offset 'access-label '-)
  (c-set-offset 'inclass '++)
  ;; ...
  (setq mode-name "My C++")
)
(add-to-list 'auto-mode-alist '("\\.[ch]p?p?\\'" . my-cpp-mode))

... I achieve only:

class A
{
    public: // access-label
        int member; // inclass
};

struct B
{
        // this indentation is too long
        int member; // inclass
};

Of course that's because:

  • for the indentation there is obviously no difference between "class" and "struct" (it's all "inclass"),
  • the indentation of "inclass" stuff doesn't depend on the presence of access labels or not.

Any idea how I can make the indentation of inclass stuff dependent on either class/struct or on the presence of access labels?

share|improve this question
    
I think you'd just want public: and private: to not add an indentation level. –  djechlin Feb 5 '13 at 19:50
    
Thanks but if you mean "{" and "public:" on the same column, no that's not what I want. –  Aurelien Feb 5 '13 at 19:53
1  
I can understand your desire, and given enough tweaking it should be possible. On the other hand, it might well be that this is not easily achieved, because the non-distinction between classes and structures runs pretty deep in C++: you can even use access specifiers for structures. As that use is rare, though, I'll +1 this question and will be interested to see if any solutions turn up. –  MvG Feb 5 '13 at 22:38
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

New Answer

I ran into the exact requirement that you had mentioned in your question. I had to setup indentation according to the coding style of my new project. After a bit of research, I achieved this using Custom Line-up Functions.

Modify your my-cpp-mode to look like this:

(defun my-c-lineup-inclass (langelem)
  (let ((inclass (assoc 'inclass c-syntactic-context)))
    (save-excursion
      (goto-char (c-langelem-pos inclass))
      (if (or (looking-at "struct")
              (looking-at "typedef struct"))
          '+
        '++))))

(defun my-cpp-mode ()
  "My C++ mode"
  (c++-mode)
  (c-set-style "K&R")
  (setq c-basic-offset 4)
  (c-set-offset 'access-label '-)
  (c-set-offset 'inclass 'my-c-lineup-inclass)
  ;; ...
  (setq mode-name "My C++")
)

If this answer is acceptable, I'll go ahead and remove the old answer.

Old Answer

Based on what you are trying to achieve, may I suggest a different approach? You seem to want the access label at a different indentation level than the class and the class members. Use the following to achieve that.

(access-label . /)

From Emacs documentation:

If OFFSET is one of the symbols +',-', ++',--', *', or/' then a positive or negative multiple of `c-basic-offset' is added to the base indentation; 1, -1, 2, -2, 0.5, and -0.5, respectively.

Here is a snippet from one of the custom styles that I have defined.

(c-add-style
 "xyz-style"
 '((indent-tabs-mode . nil)
   (fill-column . 75)
   (c-basic-offset . 4)
   (c-offsets-alist . (
                       (access-label . /)
                       (inextern-lang . 0)
                       (innamespace . 0)
                       (member-init-intro . ++)
                       ))))

With c-basic-offset set to 4, (access-label . /) adds a negative indentation of 2 spaces to the access labels. Here is the actual result of my indentation mode on your sample code.

class A
{
    // I ALWAYS use access labels in classes

  public: // access-label
    int member; // inclass
};

struct B
{
    // I NEVER use access labels in structs

    int member; // inclass
};

I recommend this mode because, the indentation level of the member variables/struct members is consistent. FWIW, Google C Style follows the same approach.

As far as I can tell, one cannot differentiate between a class member or a struct member (inclass sytax element). You can use M-x c-syntactic-information-on-region to do a syntactic analysis on a region. One such analysis on you example yields the following. From the output, there is nothing to differentiate between if you are in a class or a struct.

class A                                 // ((topmost-intro 1))
{                                       // ((class-open 1))
                                        // ((inclass 64) (topmost-intro 64) (comment-intro))I ALWAYS use access labels in classes
                                        // ((inclass 64) (topmost-intro 64))
  public:                               // ((inclass 64) (access-label 64))access-label
    int member;                         // ((inclass 64) (topmost-intro 64))inclass
};                                      // ((class-close 1))
                                        // ((topmost-intro 503))
struct B                                // ((topmost-intro 503))
{                                       // ((class-open 629))
                                        // ((inclass 694) (topmost-intro 694) (comment-intro))I NEVER use access labels in structs
                                        // ((inclass 694) (topmost-intro 694))
    int member;                         // ((inclass 694) (topmost-intro 694))inclass
};                                      // ((class-close 629))
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, thanks, this is indeed the compromiss I've decided to use, so I'll +1 your answer as it might interest a lot of emacs users. But as you said it doesn't answer the actual question. –  Aurelien Feb 7 '13 at 15:45
1  
OK in your last edit you show that it's not possible, which now definitely answers the question. Thanks. –  Aurelien Feb 7 '13 at 19:06
    
This assumes that struct always has no access labels. I wish there was a solution that would recognize when access labels are present... –  Arkadiy Jun 6 '13 at 17:24
    
Your new answer doesn't work for me. The goto-char goes to the opening brace of the class, not the class/struct definition. This is with emacs 22.3.1 (old, I know, nothing I can do about it). –  Trebor Rude Jul 24 '13 at 17:51
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Based on Praveen Kumar's answer above, I implemented a slightly different version of the custom line-up function:

(defun my-c-lineup-inclass (langelem)
  (let ((inclass (assoc 'inclass c-syntactic-context)))
    (save-excursion
      (c-beginning-of-defun) ; This sees the correct string.
      (if (or (looking-at "struct")
              (looking-at "typedef struct"))
          '+
        '++))))

; In particular, the following offsets need to be specified:
(c-set-offset 'access-label '-)
(c-set-offset 'inclass 'my-c-lineup-inclass)
; ...

The original code did not work in case the brace was on the next line, i.e.

struct foo
{
        int bar;
};

would still indent to "++".

Disclaimer: I don't know any Lisp. I just played around and this works for me. I don't know, e.g., if there are any performance issues associated with this.

share|improve this answer
    
use of (c-beginning-of-defun) isn't completely correct, as it won't work with inline functions defined in the struct/classes... –  Alex Ott Oct 7 '13 at 9:26
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The coding standards on my project now require this sort of indentation. Like Arkadiy, I prefer a solution that respects access labels. This is what I came up with:

(defun indent-after-access-label (langelem)
  "Return the appropriate indent for a class or a struct."
  (save-excursion
    (save-match-data
      ;; Optimization to avoid at least a few calls to re-search-backward.
      (if (assoc 'access-label c-syntactic-context)
          '++
        (if (re-search-backward "\\(?:p\\(?:ublic\\|r\\(?:otected\\|ivate\\)\\)\\)" c-langelem-pos langelem) t)
            '++
          '+)))))

As mentioned previously, the indent-after-acess-label symbol needs to be set as the indentation for inclass (via c-set-offset or c-offset-alist, etc.).

This is hardly ideal, due to the re-search-backward, but it does work.

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