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Take the following example class:

public class GlobalExample{
    static int width;
    static int height;
    static int size;
}

The class members can be accessed / initialized from a separate class using:

GlobalExample.width = 1

However, if I wanted to make the variables final (which as I understand it makes things more efficient when a program is accessing variables a lot) they can no longer be initialized externally, but they also can't seem to be initialized within the class outside of the constructor. However since GlobalExample is never initialized itself, the constructor wouldn't run.

My question is whether there is a way to initialize final variables within the class.

Alternately, am I just barking up the wrong tree efficiency-wise? Would it be more efficient to make an instance of a VariablePackage class and just pass it into a million function calls?

Thanks

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1  
You haven't shown us your actual code that contains final variable. You need to show how you are trying to initialize your variables. –  Rohit Jain Feb 5 '13 at 19:51
    
I'm not sure if you understand that final means the variable is set only once. –  sdasdadas Feb 5 '13 at 19:51
1  
You should encapsulate your class members with public getters/setters and keep the variables private. As well, final variables can only be set directly when they are created or inside the constructor. –  ecbrodie Feb 5 '13 at 19:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Are you unable to initialize them when you declare them?

public class GlobalExample{
    final static int width = 1;
    final static int height = 5;
    final static int size = 100;
}

If you have to modify them dynamically, perhaps final is not suitable here.

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Add a boolean for each variable that tells you whether or not it has been set, make the variables private, then check the boolean in a public setter:

public class GlobalExample{
    private static int width;
    private static int height;
    private static int size;
    private static boolean widthSet;
    private static boolean heightSet;
    private static boolean sizeSet;

    public static void setWidth(int width) {
        if (widthSet) {
            widthSet = true;
            GlobalExample.width = width;
        } else {
            // Throw exception maybe?
        }
    }

    public static int getWidth() {
        if (widthSet) {
            return width;
        } else {
            // Throw an exception
        }
    }

    // Etc.
}

Alternatively, you can use the wrapper classes (Integer, Character, etc.) and only set them if the values are null. This is similar to the boolean approach except that the boolean is integrated into the value of the variable itself (i.e. it's not set if it's null).

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In addition to initialising static final variables inline you can also use a static initialisation block:

public class MyClass {
    public static final String myFinal;
    static {
        myFinal = "Hello world";
    }
}

Within the static block you can then write the code necessary to fetch the required values.

Are you barking up the wrong tree efficiency wise? Probably. Write it simply first. Then, once you've verified that this is actually a performance bottleneck in your application, try coding it a couple of different ways and measure the impact.

Also, from a design standpoint, things that are static tend to be awkward to work with, so ask yourself if your system really needs these fields to be static.

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To run more complex initialization logic:

public class GlobalExample {
    private static final int height;
    private static final int width;

    static {
        switch(getBrowserType()) {
            case 0: height = 100; width = 50; break;
            case 1: height = 400; width = 600; break;
            default: height = 798; width = 1024; break;
        }
    }
}
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