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I have a class course like this:

public class course   
{
        public int CourseID { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }   
        public Event Schedule {get; set;} //Event is coming from library Dday.iCal  
}     

Entity framework cannot correctly understand on how to save this property. ( I want to serialize it to string when saving, and keep it as event when worknig with it in my application.) So I have two methods, say, SerializeToString() and DeserializeFromString(). I want those methods to be applied only when saving to database.

What I came up with the following. Basically I'm trying to have a separate property as a string that will be saved in the database and Event will be ignored, but it doesn't save anything to the database now. I'm not even sure if this is a good approach to do things, or there's something better that can be done.:

 public class course   
    {
            public int CourseID { get; set; }
            public string Name { get; set; }  
            private Event _Schedule;
            [NotMapped]  
            public Event Schedule {  
            get
            {
                if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(CourseSchedule))
                {
                    return DeserilizeFromString(CourseSchedule);
                }
                return new Event();
            }
            set
            {
                _schedule = value;
            }
            }  
            private string _courseSchedule;
            public string CourseSchedule { 
            get
            {
                return _courseSchedule;
            }
            private set
            {
                if (Schedule != null)
                {
                    _courseSchedule = SerializeToString(Schedule);
                }
                else
                {
                    _courseSchedule = null;
                }
            }   
 }
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2  
Entity Framework can't read your getters and setters (it assumes auto-properties). Try moving that logic to a constructor. –  Forty-Two Feb 5 '13 at 19:58
    
@Forty-Two, that's good to know. But constructor will only run when creating an object, not when manipulating it, right? So it won't work for me. What if I want to modify things in an object, should I recreate it every time? I was thinking maybe FluentAPI can help here, but not sure where to apply it –  user194076 Feb 5 '13 at 20:00
    
Maybe introducing some abstraction over this logic, you could recreate the unit of work and repository pattern and add the desired logic in a more convenient way. For example in the Course repository class you can costumize the add and find method serializing and deserializing the event field. –  Eric Javier Hernandez Saura Feb 5 '13 at 20:10
    
@EricJavierHernandezSaura, do you know a good example I can look at? –  user194076 Feb 5 '13 at 20:12
    
@user194076 I make and answer to better explain you –  Eric Javier Hernandez Saura Feb 5 '13 at 20:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should keep your models as minimalistic as possible, just the auto-properties and attributes. For more complex business logic it's good to add another layer to your MVC pattern. This one is usually called Repository (hard to find a good tutorial on Repository Pattern though.. :( )and comes between model and controller controller.

This also is very useful for performing unit tests. When properly implemented it allows you to do replace database dependency with collection during tests. This approach will require a bunch of additional work on the project.

One more approach (a simpler one) would be to add a ViewModel layer. Do it this way:

class MyModel
{
    public string Text { get; set; }
}

class MyViewModel : MyModel
{
    public new string Text
    {
        get { return base.Text; }
        set { base.Text =value.ToUpper(); }
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        MyViewModel mvm = new MyViewModel();
        mvm.Text = "hello there";
        var s = ((MyModel) mvm).Text; // "HELLO THERE"
    }
}

In DataContext use MyModel in controller use MyViewModel.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to implement your approach with derived class, but the problem is as soon as I create a derived class EF wants to add column "Discriminator" in table Courses –  user194076 Feb 6 '13 at 23:12
    
Looks like EF insists on being aware of child classes. I wanted to be smart and save you the trouble of creating a traditional ViewModel (a separate class with your Model as a field and it's own properties to access Model's properties). This Discriminator is supposed to let EF know which class your object actually belongs to. If you don't mind let EF create this column. Otherwise create a traditional ViewModel. If you need more help let me know. –  gisek Feb 6 '13 at 23:32

If you have a model that looks like this

using (LolEntities context = new LolEntities)
{
...
}

Somewhere in your application, this model is defined, usually something like this:

public partial class LolEntities : ObjectContext

(1) Notice that the class is partial, so you could just create another partial class with the same name and override:

public override int SaveChanges(SaveOptions options)

(2) Or you can just capture the event:

using (DemoAZ_8_0Entities context = new DemoAZ_8_0Entities())
{
    context.SavingChanges += ...
}

and do your formatting before it gets sent back to the DB.

In your model just make sure to include a property that properly maps to the column in the DB.

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An author on asp.net actually has an implementation of what your trying to do, almost to a tee. You may want to follow a few points in that project to get you started. The link to the project is here.

Some things to note, is it does utilize the DbContext Api that was implemented in Entity Framework. Some of the abstraction mentioned above is like this:

Your Solution:

  • Model
  • View
  • Controller
  • Data Access Layer (DAL)

The tutorial will actually go through the implementation with a Course Controller, Unit Of Work Class, and Repositories. By the end of the tutorial it will implement those automatic properties with DbContext and looks like this:

// Model:
public abstract class Person
    {
        [Key]
        public int PersonID { get; set; }

        [Required(ErrorMessage = "Last name is required.")]
        [Display(Name = "Last Name")]
        [MaxLength(50)]
        public string LastName { get; set; }

        [Required(ErrorMessage = "First name is required.")]
        [Column("FirstName")]
        [Display(Name = "First Name")]
        [MaxLength(50)]
        public string FirstMidName { get; set; }

        public string FullName
        {
            get
            {
                return LastName + ", " + FirstMidName;
            }
        }
    }

// Repository:
public class StudentRepository : IStudentRepository, IDisposable
    {
        private SchoolContext context;

        public StudentRepository(SchoolContext context)
        {
            this.context = context;
        }

        public IEnumerable<Student> GetStudents()
        {
            return context.Students.ToList();
        }

        public Student GetStudentByID(int id)
        {
            return context.Students.Find(id);
        }

        public void InsertStudent(Student student)
        {
            context.Students.Add(student);
        }

        public void DeleteStudent(int studentID)
        {
            Student student = context.Students.Find(studentID);
            context.Students.Remove(student);
        }

        public void UpdateStudent(Student student)
        {
            context.Entry(student).State = EntityState.Modified;
        }

        public void Save()
        {
            context.SaveChanges();
        }

        private bool disposed = false;

        protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (!this.disposed)
            {
                if (disposing)
                {
                    context.Dispose();
                }
            }
            this.disposed = true;
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            Dispose(true);
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
        }
    }

// Interface for Repository:
    public interface IStudentRepository : IDisposable
    {
        IEnumerable<Student> GetStudents();
        Student GetStudentByID(int studentId);
        void InsertStudent(Student student);
        void DeleteStudent(int studentID);
        void UpdateStudent(Student student);
        void Save();
    }

// Context to Generate Database:
    public class SchoolContext : DbContext
    {
        public DbSet<Course> Courses { get; set; }
        public DbSet<Department> Departments { get; set; }
        public DbSet<Enrollment> Enrollments { get; set; }
        public DbSet<Instructor> Instructors { get; set; }
        public DbSet<Student> Students { get; set; }
        public DbSet<Person> People { get; set; }
        public DbSet<OfficeAssignment> OfficeAssignments { get; set; }

        protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
        {
            modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<PluralizingTableNameConvention>();
            modelBuilder.Entity<Instructor>()
                .HasOptional(p => p.OfficeAssignment).WithRequired(p => p.Instructor);
            modelBuilder.Entity<Course>()
                .HasMany(c => c.Instructors).WithMany(i => i.Courses)
                .Map(t => t.MapLeftKey("CourseID")
                    .MapRightKey("PersonID")
                    .ToTable("CourseInstructor"));
            modelBuilder.Entity<Department>()
                .HasOptional(x => x.Administrator);
        }
    }

// Unit Of Work
public class UnitOfWork : IDisposable
    {
        private SchoolContext context = new SchoolContext();
        private GenericRepository<Department> departmentRepository;
        private CourseRepository courseRepository;

        public GenericRepository<Department> DepartmentRepository
        {
            get
            {

                if (this.departmentRepository == null)
                {
                    this.departmentRepository = new GenericRepository<Department>(context);
                }
                return departmentRepository;
            }
        }

        public CourseRepository CourseRepository
        {
            get
            {

                if (this.courseRepository == null)
                {
                    this.courseRepository = new CourseRepository(context);
                }
                return courseRepository;
            }
        }

        public void Save()
        {
            context.SaveChanges();
        }

        private bool disposed = false;

        protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (!this.disposed)
            {
                if (disposing)
                {
                    context.Dispose();
                }
            }
            this.disposed = true;
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            Dispose(true);
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
        }
    }

That is some of the content in the lesson, I believe it will answer your question pretty explicitly while giving you an understanding of why the abstraction works, since it does implement the Fluent Api.

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer

Maybe introducing some abstraction over this logic, you could recreate the unit of work and repository pattern and add the desired logic in a more convenient way. For example in the Course repository class you can costumize the add and find method serializing and deserializing the event field.

I am going to focus on the repository pattern, you can find a lot of information about the design of the whole data access layer on the web.

For example, to manage courses, your application should depends on a ICourseRepository interface like this

interface ICourseRepository
{
    void Add(Course newCourse);
    Course FindByID(int id);
}

And you provide the folowing implementation:

class CourseRepository
{
    // DbContext and maybe other fields

    public void Add(Course c)
    {

        // Serialize the event field before save the object
        _courses.Add(c);   // calling entity framework functions, note  
                           // that '_courses' variable could be an DBSet from EF
    }

    public Course FindById(int id)
    {
       var course = /// utilize EF functions here to retrieve the object
       // In course variable deserialize the event field before to return it ...
    }
}

Note that the ObjectContext in EF is an implementation of this pattern, if you are not intresting in change the ORM in the future you can just override the Save method on EF.

If you want to know more about this kind of pattern you can visit the Martin Fowler site:

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