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I'm learning OOP, and I came across this question:

If we do this:

A* a = new A;

the new operator finds a space for the variable a from the heap. I want to know the address where that variable is situated.

Question 1

Which one is that address? What is the difference between this two?

cout <<  a;
cout << &a;

Question 2 (the main)

Let's assume I do NOT delete the pointer. The program exits. As long as the pointer hasn't been destructed by the class's destructor, can I get back that object using it's address (e.g. 0x0035fa24), when I run the program again? If yes, how?

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Q1: The first one. Q2: No. Another instance of a program is just another process, and the address space is separate for each process. Your object has leaked, and is gone. Forever. – Andy Prowl Feb 5 '13 at 20:18
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Question 1

Which one is that address? What is the difference between this two?

a is the address of the object. &a is the address of the pointer.

Question 2 (the main)

Let's assume I do NOT delete the pointer. The program exits. As long as the pointer hasn't been destructed by the class's destructor, can I get back it using it's address (e.g. 0x0035fa24), when I run the program again? If yes, how?

A typical modern OS would not allow you to do this. It will reclaim memory when the first process exits. No subsequently started process will be allowed to see the contents of the first process's memory, since this would a major security risk.

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If I am not mistaken - at least in the case of Windows - after the process exits all the resources it acquired will be given back (memory, handles, etc.). Second, every process will get a new virtual address space thus the possibility of reading the memory which was previously allocated by another process is close to none, and it's basically 'impossible' to deterministically check what physical address was mapped to the virtual one. – Red XIII Feb 5 '13 at 21:00
    
@RedXIII: As a matter of fact, a modern secure OS would go out of its way to ensure that no process is ever given a memory page that still contains some other process's leftover data. It would be a major security flaw if pages didn't get wiped upon reuse. – NPE Feb 5 '13 at 21:20
    
Does this mean that the memory page is cleared to 0s/1s every time a page is released by a process? – Red XIII Feb 6 '13 at 21:23

Q1:

the new operator finds a space for the variable a from the heap

No, it doesn't. The new operator creates an object of type A. The variable a is then initialized with that address.

So, a evaluates to the address where the object lives.

&a evaluates to the address of the variable a.

Q2: Technically, that behavior is undefined (you will be dereferencing a pointer to an object that does not exist). Practically, the answer is "no". The operating system will deallocate all of the memory of your process when you exit.

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I don't think it's UB to not destroy all objects before a program ends, just highly likely to not be correct from the programmers point of view. – GManNickG Feb 5 '13 at 20:42
1  
re: copy-init. Yep. I was wrong. – Robᵩ Feb 5 '13 at 20:43
    
re: UB on memory leak. I just re-read relevant portions of the standard. I'm probably wrong. Although it is still UB to use that pointer in the subsequent run. – Robᵩ Feb 5 '13 at 20:58

Question 1:

Your variable a is a pointer. Taking &a gives the address of the pointer itself, not the address where the instance of class A is stored.

Question 2:

No, you can't do that. There isn't some "list of all the instances if A" that the machine maintains for you, unless you maintain such a list yourself.

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Answer to 1: a would be the address. the & operator returns the address of what you write later. In plain english, &a would give you the addess of a pointer, a would be the address stored by the variable a and *a is the content of the addess pointed to by a.

As for 2, I believe that is theoretically possible, but practically impossible.

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A* a = new A;
cout <<  a;
cout << &a;

In the above code snippet, you create a new A on the heap and it's address is assigned to a. you then print out a's value, this is the address of the dynamically created object. Then you print out the address of the pointer itself (on the stack).

And no, you absolutely can not reclaim the lost memory between session.

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