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I am using redis to store highly requested info, but I want to store less-requested stuff in a list/set on the disk. I have been looking around with no luck. Memcached, Riak etc. don't seem to have list/set datatypes. Is there a database that have those features?

Thanks.

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You can probably throw something together using files holding JSON stringified objects in ~100 lines of PHP. /storagedir/[key].json, get.php?key=[key]. [key] can be the encoded URI Path to the resource or a GUID. –  Louis Ricci Feb 5 '13 at 20:31
    
I need the database to have native lists/sets functions to manipulate them –  Pacemaker Feb 5 '13 at 20:35
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Seems like a relational database (RDBMS) use-case to me. You could probably use SQLite. –  Louis Ricci Feb 5 '13 at 20:40
    
even if the data set is very large? –  Pacemaker Feb 5 '13 at 20:56
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FYI: redisk is a disk-persistent Redis-compatible library that features list/set. Unfortunately: this project has been made within a 40-hour hackathon. In other words it is NOT stable at all (do not use it in production), and it is not finished (not all list/set manipulations commands are implemented). Keeping this in mind you may want to play with it (for the fun) until it gets finished (someday). –  deltheil Feb 6 '13 at 8:45

1 Answer 1

Run another Redis instance and configure it with AOF on. Append-only file.

You can read more about it here:

http://redis.io/topics/persistence

Scroll half way down, there is alot of good information on it.

Append-only file Snapshotting is not very durable. If your computer running Redis stops, your power line fails, or you accidentally kill -9 your instance, the latest data written on Redis will get lost. While this may not be a big deal for some applications, there are use cases for full durability, and in these cases Redis was not a viable option. The append-only file is an alternative, fully-durable strategy for Redis. It became available in version 1.1. You can turn on the AOF in your configuration file: appendonly yes From now on, every time Redis receives a command that changes the dataset (e.g. SET) it will append it to the AOF. When you restart Redis it will re-play the AOF to rebuild the state.

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thanks this is very useful. Don't you just love redis? For my case, I will go with using a relational database with indexing. –  Pacemaker Feb 7 '13 at 10:57

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