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Okay, I have a pretty obvious but apparently nontrivial problem to solve.

Suppose I have a simple string ab.
Now I want to replace a with b and b with a, so I end up with ba.

The hand on solution would be to do the two replaces consecutively. But the result from that is either aa or bb depending on the order.

Obviously, the production situation will have to deal with much more complex strings and more replacements than two, but the problem still applies.

One idea I had was to save positions where I replaced something. But that threw me off as soon as the replacement had a different length than the original needle.

This is general problem, but I'm working with C#. Here's some code I came up with:

string original = "abc";

Regex[] expressions = new Regex[]
{
    new Regex("a"), //replaced by ab
    new Regex("b") //replaced by c
};

string[] replacements = new string[]
{
    "ab",
    "c"
};

for (int i = 0; i < expressions.Length; i++)
    original = expressions[i].Replace(original, replacements[i]);

//Expected result: abcc
//Actual result: accc <- the b is replaced by c in the second pass.

So is there a simple way to solve this?

share|improve this question
    
How does the replacing work when you have more than 2 characters? –  DJ Burb Feb 5 '13 at 20:33
1  
Can we see some code? –  Bob. Feb 5 '13 at 20:34
    
If your replacements are only single characters (both what is being replaced and what it is replaced with), this is a single-pass algorithm - for each input character, if it needs to be replaced, output it's replacement, otherwise just output the character. Probably easiest to build a simple replacement table to reference, unless you're only replacing a couple of characters... –  twalberg Feb 5 '13 at 20:37
    
@Bob. I've added some. –  Cobra_Fast Feb 5 '13 at 20:45
    
@twalberg needles and replacements can be more than just one char. Even needle and replacement length can be different. Overlappings between different needles and replacements do not occur though. –  Cobra_Fast Feb 5 '13 at 20:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you are talking about simple one-to-one conversions, converting to a char array and doing a switch is probably ideal, however you seem to be looking for more complex replacements.

Basically the trick is to create an intermediate character to mark your temporaries. Rather than showing the actual code, here is what the string would look like as it was transformed:

ab
%1b
%1%2
b%2
ba

So basically, replace % with %%, then the first match with %1 and so on. Once they are all done replace %1 with its output and so on, finally replacing %% with %.

Be careful though, if you can guarantee that your intermediate syntax doesn't taint your input you are okay, if you cannot, you will need to use a tricks to make sure you aren't prefaced by an odd number of %. (So %%a would match, but %%%a would not, since that would mean the special value %a)

share|improve this answer

Here’s one solution. Try all the regular expressions against the string, do the replacement on the earliest match, then recurse on the remaining part of the string. If you need this to be faster but more complicated, you could ask for all Matches() right at the start and process them from left to right, adjusting their Indexes as you replace expressions with longer and shorter strings, and throwing away any overlaps.

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

class MultiRegex {

    static String Replace(String text, Regex[] expressions,
            String[] replacements, int start=0)
    {
        // Try matching each regex; save the first match
        Match firstMatch = null;
        int firstMatchingExpressionIndex = -1;
        for (int i = 0; i < expressions.Length; i++) {
            Regex r = expressions[i];
            Match m = r.Match(text, start);
            if (m.Success
                    && (firstMatch == null || m.Index < firstMatch.Index))
            {
                firstMatch = m;
                firstMatchingExpressionIndex = i;
            }
        }

        if (firstMatch == null) {
            /* No matches anywhere */
            return text;
        }

        // Replace text, then recurse
        String newText = text.Substring(0, firstMatch.Index)
            + replacements[firstMatchingExpressionIndex]
            + text.Substring(firstMatch.Index + firstMatch.Length);
        return Replace(newText, expressions, replacements,
                start + replacements[firstMatchingExpressionIndex].Length);
    }

    public static void Main() {

        Regex[] expressions = new Regex[]
        {
            new Regex("a"), //replaced by ab
            new Regex("b") //replaced by c
        };

        string[] replacements = new string[]
        {
            "ab",
            "c"
        };

        string original = "a b c";
        Console.WriteLine(
                Replace(original, expressions, replacements));

        // Should be "baz foo bar"
        Console.WriteLine(Replace("foo bar baz",
                    new Regex[] { new Regex("bar"), new Regex("baz"),
                        new Regex("foo") },
                    new String[] { "foo", "bar", "baz" }));
    }
}

This prints:

ab c c
baz foo bar
share|improve this answer

If you use (\ba\b) to represent matching the letter a and only the letter a, whereas ab won't be matched. Similar for the b, it would be (\bb\b).

 string original = "a b c";
 Regex[] expressions = new Regex[] {
      // @ sign used to signify a literal string
      new Regex(@"(\ba\b)"), // \b represents a word boundary, between a word and a space
      new Regex(@"(\bb\b)"),
 };
 string[] replacements = new string[] {
      "ab",
      "c"
 };
 for(int i = 0; i < expressions.Length; i++)
      original = expressions[i].Replace(original, replacements[i]);

Edit 1: Question changed to without spaces between the letters to match, wanted the same abcc from abc, I just reversed the order in which the regular expression was checked.

 Regex[] expressions = new Regex[] {
      new Regex(@"b"), //replaced by c
      new Regex(@"a"), //replaced by ab
 };
 string[] replacements = new string[] {
      "c",
      "ab",
 };

Edit 2: Answer changed to reflect variable length to match, this matches based on order of patterns to check, checks for the pattern, then moves to new string

 string original = "a bc";

 Regex[] expressions = new Regex[] {
      new Regex(@"a"), //replaced by ab
      new Regex(@"b"), //replaced by c
 };

 string[] replacements = new string[] {
      "ab",
      "c",
 };
 string newString = string.Empty;
 string workingString = string.Empty;
 // Position of start point in string
 int index = 0;
 // Length to retrieve
 int length = 1;
 while(index < original.Length) {
      // Retrieve a piece of the string
      workingString = original.Substring(index, length);
      // Whether the expression has been matched
      bool found = false;
      for(int i = 0; i < expressions.Length && !found; i++) {
           if(expressions[i].Match(workingString).Success) {
                // If expression matched, add the replacement value to the new string
                newString += expressions[i].Replace(workingString, replacements[i]);
                // Mark expression as found
                found = true;
           }
      }
      if(!found) {
           // If not found, increase length (check for more than one character patterns)
           length++;
           // If the rest of the entire string doesn't match anything, move the character at **index** into the new string
           if(length >= (original.Length - index)) {
                newString += original.Substring(index, 1);
                index++;
                length = 1;
           }
      }
      // If a match was found, start over at next position in string
      else {
           index += length;
           length = 1;
      }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
There don't necessarily have to be spaces between the needles in the string... –  Cobra_Fast Feb 5 '13 at 21:20
    
@Cobra_Fast Edited, if you want the same result, you just reverse what you check first, check for b, then replace all b with c, then check for a and replace with ab, that way the b in ab won't be replaced. –  Bob. Feb 5 '13 at 21:35
    
You're sticking too close to the example I have in my answer. Order, string and replacements can vary a lot. –  Cobra_Fast Feb 5 '13 at 21:38
    
Oh, I think I know understand, you don't want any of the matching to be replaced with another Regex, right? I'd loop through, find the matches for your Regex, push each "matched pair" into a List<string>, then loop through the List<string> to replace with your replacements, then flatten them all out into a string. –  Bob. Feb 5 '13 at 21:43
    
Could you update your answer? I don't quite get it. –  Cobra_Fast Feb 5 '13 at 21:49

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