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class a

{ 

void fun(Integer a,Integer b)

{
   a=a+b;

b=a-b;

a=a-b;

}

public static void main(String ...k)

{

    Integer a=new Integer(10);

    Integer b= new Integer(20);

    new a().fun(a,b);
    System.out.println(a+" "+b);
    }
    }

o/p:10 20

so no swapping happened

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closed as not a real question by Lion, EJP, bensiu, Sudarshan, Sankar Ganesh Feb 6 '13 at 6:12

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
See - Is Java “pass-by-reference”?. –  Lion Feb 5 '13 at 20:40
    
Can this be the alternative method for above? class a {int a,b; a() {} a(int m,int n) { a=m; b=n; } void fun(a ob) { ob.a=ob.a+ob.b; ob.b=ob.a-ob.b; ob.a=ob.a-ob.b; } public static void main(String ...k) { a ob=new a(10,20); new a().fun(ob); System.out.println(ob.a+" "+ob.b); } } –  Aakash Feb 5 '13 at 20:52
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Java isn't pass by reference. It passes references by value.

Your fun method is equivalent to

a = Integer.valueOf(a.intValue() + b.intValue()); b = Integer.valueOf(a.intValue() - b.intValue()); a = Integer.valueOf(a.intValue() - b.intValue());

which reassigns the variable a to point to a new Integer, which has no effect whatsoever on the a in main.

To get anything resembling the behavior you want, you must use mutable objects (Integer is quite deliberately immutable) and reassign their contents.

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+1 for the note in mutability. –  G. Bach Feb 5 '13 at 20:41
    
so to use pass by reference kinda thing shall i use the object of class 'a' nd pass it to fun method? –  Aakash Feb 5 '13 at 20:46
    
@user2044608: "pass by reference" is not available in Java. Java always uses the "pass by value" method and it always passes object references as values (not the objects themselves) as the answer implies. –  Lion Feb 5 '13 at 20:53
    
Yup i cmpltly agree with u.... Butc can this be the alternative method???? class a {int a,b; a() {} a(int m,int n) { a=m; b=n; } void fun(a ob) { ob.a=ob.a+ob.b; ob.b=ob.a-ob.b; ob.a=ob.a-ob.b; } public static void main(String ...k) { a ob=new a(10,20); new a().fun(ob); System.out.println(ob.a+" "+ob.b); } } –  Aakash Feb 5 '13 at 20:55
    
That would work. But why bother with all that crap anyway? If you want to swap two variables, do so in the method where you're trying to swap them, with a third variable c. It's three straightforward lines, and not worth this much bother. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 5 '13 at 20:57
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I believe this will help you.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/arguments.html

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thnx.. really helpful –  Aakash Feb 6 '13 at 13:57
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In first place, Integer is immutable.

But here, you pass by reference, but you don't modify the internal state of tour object, only the "pointer"

If you want to modify the state, use AtomicInteger and the method "set", like

import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger;

public class Test {

    void fun(final AtomicInteger a, final AtomicInteger b)
    {
        a.set(a.get() + b.get());
        b.set(a.get() - b.get());
        a.set(a.get() - b.get());
    }

    public static void main(String... k)
    {
        final AtomicInteger a = new AtomicInteger(10);
        final AtomicInteger b = new AtomicInteger(20);

        new Test().fun(a, b);
        System.out.println(a.get() + " " + b.get());
    }
}

result will be : 20 10

Because you modify the internal state of the object passed by reference.

You propose :

public class Test {
    int a, b;

    Test(int m, int n)
    {
        a = m;
        b = n;
    }

    static void fun(Test ob)
    {
        ob.a = ob.a + ob.b;
        ob.b = ob.a - ob.b;
        ob.a = ob.a - ob.b;
    }

    public static void main(String... k) throws Exception
    {
        Test ob = new Test(10, 20);
        Test.fun(ob);
        System.out.println(ob.a + " " + ob.b);
        Thread.sleep(10000);
    }
}

and it's "work" as you want


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Can this be the alternative method?? class a {int a,b; a() {} a(int m,int n) { a=m; b=n; } void fun(a ob) { ob.a=ob.a+ob.b; ob.b=ob.a-ob.b; ob.a=ob.a-ob.b; } public static void main(String ...k) { a ob=new a(10,20); new a().fun(ob); System.out.println(ob.a+" "+ob.b); } } –  Aakash Feb 5 '13 at 20:53
    
?????????????????????????????????????? –  Aakash Feb 5 '13 at 21:18
    
reponse in edit –  twillouer Feb 5 '13 at 21:54
    
thnx a lot. really appreciable help –  Aakash Feb 6 '13 at 12:03
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we know that the class varibles are passed by reference to methods

No we don't. You are mistaken. Class variables are not passed by reference to methods. Nothing is passed by reference to methods.

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ok I see sir.. But closing my question was really uncalled for. Its like you are bragging about ur gold badges.. Anyways appreciable help.. thnx –  Aakash Feb 6 '13 at 12:27
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