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I'm creating a d.ts file for webgl-utils.js from google

I have a problem with one of the last lines where a method in a global object is 'monkey patched' (I think this is the right terminology)

The problem line reads:

 /**
  * Provides requestAnimationFrame in a cross browser way.
  */
 window.requestAnimFrame = (function() {
   return window.requestAnimationFrame ||
          window.webkitRequestAnimationFrame ||
          window.mozRequestAnimationFrame ||
          window.oRequestAnimationFrame ||
          window.msRequestAnimationFrame ||
          function(/* function FrameRequestCallback */ callback, /* DOMElement Element */ element) {
            window.setTimeout(callback, 1000/60);
          };
 })();

How would I declare this in my typescript file so I won't get compile errors when I use the function:

 function tick()
 {
      requestAnimFrame(tick);
      drawScene();
 }

I now have tried:

 interface window
 {
      requestAnimFrame(): any;
 }

But this doesn't remove the error:

 The name 'requestAnimFrame' does not exist in the current scope
share|improve this question
    
Have you tried explicitly prefixing it with window.? –  Bergi Feb 5 '13 at 20:45
    
Yes, that gives the identical error –  Toad Feb 5 '13 at 21:15
    
also, the intellisense in VisStudio doesn't show the method. It does show the normal: requestAnimationFrame() but not the new one –  Toad Feb 5 '13 at 21:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You were heading in the right direction, but you need to define all of the variations you have:

 interface Window {
     requestAnimFrame(callback: any, element?: any): void;
     webkitRequestAnimationFrame(callback: any, element?: any): void;
     mozRequestAnimationFrame(callback: any, element?: any): void;
     oRequestAnimationFrame(callback: any, element?: any): void;
 }

 window.requestAnimFrame = (function() {
    return window.requestAnimationFrame ||
        window.webkitRequestAnimationFrame ||
        window.mozRequestAnimationFrame ||
        window.oRequestAnimationFrame ||
        window.msRequestAnimationFrame ||
        function(callback, element?) {
            window.setTimeout(callback, 1000/60);
        };
 })();

function tick() {
    window.requestAnimFrame(tick);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
awesome. works perfectly now. –  Toad Feb 6 '13 at 10:00
    
Does this extend the Window interface in lib.d.ts, or mask it? My experience suggests that this approach hides other functions such as window.setInterval. –  Drew Noakes Oct 2 at 17:10
    
Interfaces are open in TypeScript, so as long as you add the second interface Window in the same common root (at the same level logically) as the original, it will add to the existing interface. With global interfaces, it is really easy to ensure it has the same common root :) –  Steve Fenton Oct 3 at 7:32

make sure the interface name starts with capital "W" not "w"

interface Window {
   requestAnimFrame():any;
}

In the calling code use window.requestAnimFrame();. Hope this will solve your problem

share|improve this answer

another way:

declare var wnd: {
    requestAnimationFrame: any;
    webkitRequestAnimationFrame: any;
    mozRequestAnimationFrame: any;
    oRequestAnimationFrame: any;
    msRequestAnimationFrame: any;
}
var wnd = window;

export var requestAnimFrame = (function () {
    return wnd.requestAnimationFrame ||
           wnd.webkitRequestAnimationFrame ||
           wnd.mozRequestAnimationFrame ||
           wnd.oRequestAnimationFrame ||
           wnd.msRequestAnimationFrame ||
           function (/* function FrameRequestCallback */ callback, /* DOMElement Element */ element) {
               window.setTimeout(callback, 1000 / 60);
           };
})();
share|improve this answer

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