Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

That is a beginner question to understand where I might be wrong using the switch statement. The task is as follows: Write a program that accepts two integer values typed in by the user. Display the result of dividing the first integer by the second, to three-decimal-place accuracy. Remember to have the program check for division by zero.

To test whether the second operand is a 0, I have used switch statement (I know I could have done that with if...else). However, the program will still accept 0 as the operand I am unsure why this happens. If it tries to calculate the division by 0, the program will simply fail. Could you please give me a hint as to where I might be wrong? My code is below:

  #include <stdio.h>

  int main (void)

  {
         int a, b;


   printf ("Type two integer values: ");
   scanf ("%i %i", &a, &b);

   switch (a/b)
   {

   case 'b == 0':
        printf ("\n The divisor can't be 0.\n");

   break;

   default:
           printf ("The result of dividing %i by %i is %.3f\n", a, b,(float) a / b);

   break;
  }
  return 0;

  }

Thanks for your help!

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Nikolai N Fetissov, AAA, Jens Gustedt, ybungalobill, Karoly Horvath Feb 5 '13 at 21:58

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
'b == 0' should be b == 0; shouldn't it? I'm not sure since I have never used a switch statement. But it still doesn't look like valid C to me. –  Keith Miller Feb 5 '13 at 21:07
1  
and this switch(a/b) does not make any sense there ... –  F. Müller Feb 5 '13 at 21:08
2  
Okay honestly this code doesn't make any sense at all... voting to close as narq, please read C books. –  AAA Feb 5 '13 at 21:09
3  
Calling BS on this one. Please read some basic book on C language first. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Feb 5 '13 at 21:09
1  
@KeithMiller I've found lots of problems. –  AAA Feb 5 '13 at 21:11

3 Answers 3

 switch (b)
   {
   case 0:
        printf ("\n The divisor can't be 0.\n");

   break;
   default:
           printf ("The result of dividing %i by %i is %.3f\n", a, b,(float) a / b);
   break;
  }

Also note, the expressions following case must be constants such as:

case 0:
case 1:
case 'a':
case 'b':

etc

There.. that should fix it.

share|improve this answer
1  
the second break is unnecessairy and he should better use a function for this but this answer is ok –  F. Müller Feb 5 '13 at 21:13
    
Yeah, it does really fix it! Thanks! –  wondersz1 Feb 5 '13 at 21:14
    
@wondersz1 that's cool –  Aniket Feb 5 '13 at 21:15
    
Downvoting for posting complete code when it's clear the user does not understand the mechanisms s/he is inquiring about. –  AAA Feb 5 '13 at 21:17
    
@djechlin see meta.stackexchange.com/questions/16236/… –  Aniket Feb 5 '13 at 21:25

Case labels cannot be conditional expressions; they must be constant integer values.

In this case, you want to write:

switch (b) {
case 0:
    /* stuff goes here */
    break;
}

However, a switch statement is very weird here. An if statement would be more appropriate.

share|improve this answer
1  
that's not a conditional statement, its compiler dependent literal –  Aniket Feb 5 '13 at 21:16
    
@David Morris Thanks for pointing this out. –  wondersz1 Feb 5 '13 at 21:23

Try changing the switch statement to switch (b)

share|improve this answer
    
-1 this answer is useless (fact is already mentionned) and unnecessairy as it is already solved –  F. Müller Feb 5 '13 at 21:22

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.