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Task<string> RunList(int client)
{
    return pages[client];
}

private async void Form1_DoubleClick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    for (int x = 0; x < listBox1.Items.Count; x++)
    {
        RunList(x);
    }
} 

This will fly through the loop of tasks, but how do you know when the results are all in without compromising speed of the loop?

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any await or .Wait() will slow it down to a crawl, doing only 1 page at a time, where I'm looking for all of them to start, then notified when all results have been calculated. Errors I should be able to take care of.. Might need some help with Aggregate errors though, I've been stuck there once also.. (InnerExceptions?) –  nobodies Feb 5 '13 at 21:21

1 Answer 1

You can await on the result of WhenAll to ensure that all of the tasks have completed at that point in code. (It's important not to use WaitAll here, that would block the UI thread.)

private async void Form1_DoubleClick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var tasks = new List<Task<string>>();
    for (int x = 0; x < listBox1.Items.Count; x++)
    {
        tasks.Add(RunList(x));
    }
    await Task.WhenAll(tasks);
}

The basic idea here is to simply start the tasks before calling await on them. Here is a simpler example with just two Tasks:

await Task.Delay(1000);
await Task.Delay(1000);

This will perform the first task and then the second task.

var task1 =  Task.Delay(1000);
var task2 =  Task.Delay(1000);

await task1;
await task2;

This will start both tasks and then continue on after both tasks have finished, allowing then to run concurrently.

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+1 for not blocking. –  Bennor McCarthy Feb 5 '13 at 21:31
    
this seems to only run the very last item on the list 'x' amt of times, why would this be? –  nobodies Feb 5 '13 at 21:42
    
@nobodies That would be a problem with your RunList method. We can't really say since we have no idea how it's implemented. –  Servy Feb 5 '13 at 21:44
    
await Task.WhenAll(task); should this be await Task.WhenAll(tasks); –  nobodies Feb 5 '13 at 21:44
    
yep correct @Servy, thanks –  nobodies Feb 5 '13 at 21:52

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