Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've written up a small bit (about 200 lines) of incomplete but (SHOULD BE) functioning argument handling code. By incomplete, I mean I haven't added in conditionals for arguments other than ?, -h, and --help, arguments that are too long, and arguments that are unrecognized.

I recently took it upon myself to stuff all the controlling variables into one array and began imposing checks on their values (I planned to impose the checks beforehand). The checks simply prevent certain values from leaving what I've read is portably acceptable for the type. Now that I've added the checks in though, I get random segmentation faults. Sometimes when I run the compiled code I get a segmentation fault, sometimes I don't, but everything would seem the same each run through. Perhaps I do not understand invoking segmentation faults very well. I quickly added in a function 'pdebug' which prints a number specified as an argument, and sprinkled them at the beginning and ends to conditionals and loops where I suspected such was originating from.

The following is the output from my program over multiple run throughs:

charles@draton-generico:~/Documents/C/C89/SDL_Work/2D-game-base$ ./game-base-02

1

2

No arguments to process.

charles@draton-generico:~/Documents/C/C89/SDL_Work/2D-game-base$ ./game-base-02

1

2

No arguments to process.

charles@draton-generico:~/Documents/C/C89/SDL_Work/2D-game-base$ ./game-base-02 --help

1

3

4

Segmentation fault (core dumped)

charles@draton-generico:~/Documents/C/C89/SDL_Work/2D-game-base$ ./game-base-02 --help

1

3

4

5

6

argv[1]: successfully caught argument '--help'.

Successfully exited argument catching loop.

Every runthrough would appear to have went as planned except the third.

The following is my code, look for a comment indicating where I think the offending code is or just follow the output of my program and the pdebugs:

/* CREATED BY:  Charles Edwin Swain 3rd
 * DATE OF PROJECT BEGINNING:  28/1/2013
 * NOTES TO SELF:
 *  Important note about lvalues that could be inputted as arguments:
 *  -either they are declared outside the if/else conditional just before it, or in both.
 *  -in the latter of the two, the lvalue that dictates if an argument has been given twice will be used to determine if the lvalue it is associated with has been declared.
 *  -in the end everything will be declared and sorted through eventually.
 *  Although a numbering convention for error return values would be a neat addition and helpful to debugging, it would be best to add such at the end of writing this.
 */

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int pdebug(int nmb)
{
int chk[2];
chk[0] = -1;
chk[1] = 0;
if (fprintf(stdout, "%d\n", nmb) <= 0)
{
    while ((chk[0] <= 0)&&(chk[1] < 50))
    {
        chk[0] = fprintf(stderr, "A function (fprintf) failed.\n");
        chk[1] = chk[1] + 1;
    }
    return -1;
}
return 0;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
pdebug(1);
int bse[3];
bse[0] = 0;
while (bse[0] < 3)
{
    bse[bse[0]] = 0;
    bse[0] = bse[0] + 1;
}
bse[1] = -1;
if (argc <= 1)
{
    pdebug(2);
    if (fprintf(stdout, "No arguments to process.\n") <= 0)
    {
        while ((bse[1] <= 0)&&(bse[2] < 50))
        {
            bse[1] = fprintf(stderr, "A function (fprintf) failed while alerting the user of having no arguments to process.\n\tWill now exit.\n");
            bse[2] = bse[2] + 1;
        }
        exit(-1);
    }
    /*SET DEFAULT VALUES HERE.*/
}
else
{
    pdebug(3);
    int arg[argc + 6];
    while (bse[0] < (argc + 6))
    {
        arg[bse[0]] = 0;
        bse[0] = bse[0] + 1;
    }
    bse[0] = 0;
    pdebug(4);
    /*THIS SETS 'arg[argc + 2]' TO THE SIZE OF THE LARGEST ARGUMENT STRING.*/
    /*THIS IS WHERE THE SEGMENTATION FAULTS ARE OCCURING. THIS WHILE LOOP.*/
    while (arg[argc + 0] < argc)
    {
        while (arg[argc + 1] != -1)
        {
            if (argv[arg[argc + 0]][arg[argc + 1]] == '\0')
            {
                arg[argc + 0] = arg[argc + 0] + 1;
                if ((arg[argc + 1] + 1) > arg[argc + 2]) arg[argc + 2] = arg[argc + 1] + 1;
                arg[argc + 1] = -1;
            }
            else if (arg[argc + 1] == 32766)
            {
                arg[arg[argc + 0]] = 1;
                arg[argc + 0] = arg[argc + 0] + 1;
                arg[argc + 1] = -1;
            }
            else arg[argc + 1] = arg[argc + 1] + 1;
        }
        arg[argc + 1] = 0;
    }
    pdebug(5);
    if (arg[argc + 2] < 7) arg[argc + 2] = arg[argc + 2] + (7 - arg[argc + 2]);
    char ahs[arg[argc + 2]];
    /*IF YOU WANT, ADD A NAME CHECK HERE.*/
    arg[argc + 0] = 1;
    pdebug(6);
    /*THIS IS THE BIG ARGUMENT CATCHING LOOP.*/
    while (arg[argc + 0] < argc)
    {
        if (arg[arg[argc + 0]] == 1)
        {
            if (fprintf(stdout, "argv[%d]:  argument is composed of too many characters (max is 32766, including the null character).\n", arg[argc + 0]) <= 0)
            {
                while ((bse[1] <= 0)&&(bse[2] < 50))
                {
                    bse[1] = fprintf(stderr, "A function (fprintf) failed in the argument catching loop.\n\tWill now exit.\n");
                    bse[2] = bse[2] + 1;
                }
                exit(-1);
            }
            arg[argc + 4] = 0;
            arg[argc + 3] = -1;
        }
        else
        {
            /*THIS SETS THE CONTENTS OF THE ARRAY 'ahs' TO THE NULL CHARACTER.*/
            while (arg[argc + 1] != arg[argc + 2])
            {
                ahs[arg[argc + 1]] = '\0';
                arg[argc + 1] = arg[argc + 1] + 1;
            }
            arg[argc + 1] = 0;
            /*THIS RETREIVES THE CONTENTS OF 'argv[arg[argc + 0]]' AND PLACES THEM IN 'ahs'.*/
            while (arg[argc + 1] != -1)
            {
                ahs[arg[argc + 1]] = argv[arg[argc + 0]][arg[argc + 1]];
                if (ahs[arg[argc + 1]] == '\0') arg[argc + 1] = -1;
                else arg[argc + 1] = arg[argc + 1] + 1;
            }
            arg[argc + 1] = 0;
            /*THESE ARE THE CONDITIONALS CHECKING THE RETREIVED ARGUMENTS.*/
            if (((arg[argc + 4] == 0)&&(arg[argc + 5] == 0))&&(((ahs[0] == '?')&&(ahs[1] == '\0'))||((ahs[0] == '-')&&(ahs[1] == 'h')&&(ahs[2] == '\0'))||((ahs[0] == '-')&&(ahs[1] == '-')&&(ahs[2] == 'h')&&(ahs[3] == 'e')&&(ahs[4] == 'l')&&(ahs[5] == 'p')&&(ahs[6] == '\0'))))
            {
                arg[argc + 5] = 1;
                if (fprintf(stdout, "argv[%d]:  successfully caught argument '%s'.\n", arg[argc + 0], ahs) <= 0)
                {
                    while ((bse[1] <= 0)&&(bse[2] < 50))
                    {
                        bse[1] = fprintf(stderr, "A function (fprintf) failed in the argument catching loop.\n\tWill now exit.\n");
                        bse[2] = bse[2] + 1;
                    }
                    exit(-1);
                }
            }
            else if (((arg[argc + 4] == 0)&&(arg[argc + 5] == 1))&&(((ahs[0] == '?')&&(ahs[1] == '\0'))||((ahs[0] == '-')&&(ahs[1] == 'h')&&(ahs[2] == '\0'))||((ahs[0] == '-')&&(ahs[1] == '-')&&(ahs[2] == 'h')&&(ahs[3] == 'e')&&(ahs[4] == 'l')&&(ahs[5] == 'p')&&(ahs[6] == '\0'))))
            {
                arg[argc + 3] = -1;
                if (fprintf(stdout, "argv[%d]:  duplicate synonym to '?', '-h', or '--help' argument.\n", arg[argc + 0]) <= 0)
                {
                    while ((bse[1] <= 0)&&(bse[2] < 50))
                    {
                        bse[1] = fprintf(stderr, "A function (fprintf) failed in the argument catching loop.\n\tWill now exit.\n");
                        bse[2] = bse[2] + 1;
                    }
                    exit(-1);
                }
            }
            else
            {
                arg[argc + 3] = -1;
                if (fprintf(stdout, "argv[%d]:  unrecognized argument '%s'.\n", arg[argc + 0], ahs) <= 0)
                {
                    while ((bse[1] <= 0)&&(bse[2] < 50))
                    {
                        bse[1] = fprintf(stderr, "A function (fprintf) failed in the argument catching loop.\n\tWill now exit.\n");
                        bse[2] = bse[2] + 1;
                    }
                    exit(-1);
                }
            }
        }
        arg[argc + 1] = 0;
        arg[argc + 0] = arg[argc + 0] + 1;
    }
    if (arg[argc + 3] == -1)
    {
        if (fprintf(stdout, "Argument catcher has asked for exit to be called after exiting the argument catching loop.\n\tWill now exit.\n") <= 0)
        {
            while ((bse[1] <= 0)&&(bse[2] < 50))
            {
                bse[1] = fprintf(stderr, "A function (fprintf) failed when outputting a notification informing impending exit by demand of an argument catcher in the argument catching loop.\n\tWill now exit.\n");
                bse[2] = bse[2] + 1;
            }
            exit(-1);
        }
        exit(-1);
    }
    if (fprintf(stdout, "Successfully exited argument catching loop.\n") <= 0)
    {
        while ((bse[1] <= 0)&&(bse[2] < 50))
        {
            bse[1] = fprintf(stderr, "A function (fprintf) failed when outputting a notification informing of having 'properly' left the argument catching loop.\n\tWill now exit.\n");
            bse[2] = bse[2] + 1;
        }
        exit(-1);
    }
    /*SET DEFAULT VALUES HERE.*/
}
/*ENVIRONMENT SETUP HERE.*/

/*END OF CODE.*/
exit(0);
}

I have no idea why this is producing segmentation faults, but any chance at turning this into a learning experience would be helpful, so please do explain. Also, should I put a cap on the number of arguments accepted?

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Jens Gustedt, Sean Bright, iMat, ybungalobill, Sgoettschkes Feb 6 '13 at 8:25

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Use a debugger to find out where it is crashing. When it is random it is either a hardware problem or uninitialized variables or access out of bounds. –  wilx Feb 5 '13 at 21:35
1  
Yikes - makes my head hurt: ahs[arg[argc + 1]] = argv[arg[argc + 0]][arg[argc + 1]]; –  Michael Burr Feb 5 '13 at 21:37
1  
Can you not use getopt? This code is completely unreadable. –  Sean Bright Feb 5 '13 at 21:39
2  
If you run the program under a debugger (for example, with gdb --args ./game-base-02 --help) you will get a stack trace when a segmentation fault occurs. This should tell you which memory access triggered the segmentation fault, –  David Morris Feb 5 '13 at 21:40
4  
Also, this line made me chuckle: fprintf(stderr, "A function (fprintf) failed.\n"); –  Sean Bright Feb 5 '13 at 21:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I took a few moments to step through your code in the debugger (it wasn't that hard), and determined that arg[0], arg[1], arg[2] are never initialized in this loop (line 60):

int arg[argc + 6];
while (bse[0] < (argc + 6))
{
    arg[bse[0]] = 0;
    bse[0] = bse[0] + 1;
}

that is because bse[0] = 3, because of this code here (line 36):

while (bse[0] < 3)
{
    bse[bse[0]] = 0;
    bse[0] = bse[0] + 1;
}

I would offer assistance in rewriting, but I can't figure out what the heck you are doing

share|improve this answer
    
Wow - you are my hero for going through the trouble of figuring this out! +1 –  Michael Dorgan Feb 5 '13 at 21:50
    
Wow, to think I spent hours trying to figure out what was wrong without using a debugger, looking at the wrong lines of code. facepalm Anyway I added bse[0] = 0;, now occupying line 41. Thanks for the help. –  Draeton Feb 5 '13 at 22:03
    
the debugger is your friend. I frequently thank {higher powers} that I never had to program in the "punch card" days. I would be unemployed. –  David Hope Feb 5 '13 at 22:06
    
Note that the initialization of the bse[] array was called out in the comments above as being needlessly complex/unreadable/obfuscated/whatever. For whatever that's worth. –  Michael Burr Feb 5 '13 at 22:47

The real solution here is to delete all of that code and use a library, instead. Everyone - you, anyone who would read or maintain your code, and anybody who would use or compile your program - will be far happier for it. I don't mean to be snarky, here - this really is the thing to do.

If you need custom functionality on top of what a library gives you, then build your code on top of what that library already does. As a commenter already said, why not use getopt and build on top of that?

If this is for a school project/just for you to practice or learn with, then I apologize and I'll delete my answer.

share|improve this answer
1  
That's not a real answer in any case. But on the other end the question is not a real question either ... –  Jens Gustedt Feb 5 '13 at 21:44
    
@JensGustedt: it's not a direct answer to his question, but it might ultimately be the correct one. something like: "Why is this segfaulting?" "Why do you need this code to work?" "Oh I want to handle command line arguments and I'm getting a segfault." "Use getopt, that library will work fine for your use case." "Oh okay, great." –  Claudiu Feb 5 '13 at 21:46
    
Sure, but a comment would completely suffice. –  Jens Gustedt Feb 5 '13 at 21:56
    
I'm self taught, no need to apologize. Also, I find writing argument handling code a great way to learn a language, for some reason. –  Draeton Feb 5 '13 at 22:06

Ok, your code makes my head hurt unnecessarily. It's nearly impossible to follow what you are doing with your various array lookups and that is more than likely where your bug occurs. Create some more, better (longer) named, local variables. Seriously, if I saw something like argv[arg[argc + 0]][arg[argc + 1]] in any code, I would go track down the offending party and have a very long talk about their continued employment. Also, go lookup Magic Numbers. I'll wait...

Ok, now don't do that!

Take care of those two issues and the segfault will become much easier to spot by us or anyone else looking at your code.

share|improve this answer
    
Turns out the bug was in me not resetting a value near the start of the program. –  Draeton Feb 5 '13 at 22:09

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.