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I don't know why this is so hard for me to wrap my head around. I've looked through the wiki pages, and pseudo code (as well as actual code) trying to understand how radix sort algorithms work (with respect to buckets).

Am I looking into the wrong thing here? Should I be looking into bucket sort maybe? Can someone give me a dumbed down version of how it works? For reference, here is a codeblock that supposedly performs a radix sort:

// Sort 'size' number of integers starting at 'input' according to the 'digit'th digit
// For the parameter 'digit', 0 denotes the least significant digit and increases as significance does
void radixSort(int* input, int size, int digit)
{
    if (size == 0)
        return;

    int[10] buckets;    // assuming decimal numbers

    // Sort the array in place while keeping track of bucket starting indices.
    // If bucket[i] is meant to be empty (no numbers with i at the specified digit),
    // then let bucket[i+1] = bucket[i]

    for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
    {
        radixSort(input + buckets[i], buckets[i+1] - buckets[i], digit+1);
    }
}

And I've looked at non-recursive solutions also:

void radixsort(int *a, int arraySize)
{
    int i, bucket[sortsize], maxVal = 0, digitPosition =1 ;
    for(i = 0; i < arraySize; i++) {
        if(a[i] > maxVal) maxVal = a[i];
    }

    int pass = 1; 
    while(maxVal/digitPosition > 0) {
        // reset counter 
        int digitCount[10] = {0};

        // count pos-th digits (keys) 
        for(i = 0; i < arraySize; i++)
            digitCount[a[i]/digitPosition%10]++;

        // accumulated count 
        for(i = 1; i < 10; i++)
            digitCount[i] += digitCount[i-1];

        // To keep the order, start from back side
        for(i = arraySize - 1; i >= 0; i--)
            bucket[--digitCount[a[i]/digitPosition%10]] = a[i];

        for(i = 0; i < arraySize; i++)
            a[i] = bucket[i];

        cout << "pass #" << pass++ << ": ";
        digitPosition *= 10;
    } 

}

Specifically, this line is giving me troubles. I've tried walking through it with pen and paper, but I still can't figure out what this is doing:

   // To keep the order, start from back side
        for(i = arraySize - 1; i >= 0; i--)
            bucket[--digitCount[a[i]/digitPosition%10]] = a[i];
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2 Answers 2

up vote 33 down vote accepted

In mathematics, radix means base, where decimal would be base 10. Imagine you have numbers some of which having more than one digits like

5, 213, 55, 21, 2334, 31, 20, 430

For simplicity, say you want to use the decimal radix (=10) for sorting. Then you would start by separating the numbers by units and then putting them together again; next you would separate the numbers by tens and then put them together again; then by hundreds and so on until all the numbers are sorted. Each time you loop, just read the list from left to right. You can also imagine you are separating the numbers into buckets. Here is an illustration using 5, 213, 55, 21, 2334, 31, 20, 430

Separate by units:

  • zeros: 20, 430

  • ones: 21, 31

  • twos:

  • threes: 213

  • fours: 2334

  • fives: 5, 55

    Back together: 20, 430, 21, 31, 213, 2334, 5, 55

To put them back together, first read the zeroes bucket, then the ones bucket, then so on, until you read the nines bucket.

Separate by tens:

  • zeros: 05

  • ones: 213

  • twos: 20, 21

  • threes: 430, 31, 2334,

  • fours:

  • fives: 55

    Back together: 5, 213, 20, 21, 430, 31, 2334, 55

Separate by hundreds:

  • zeros: 005, 020, 021, 031, 055

  • ones:

  • twos: 213

  • threes: 2334

  • fours: 430

  • fives:

    Back together: 5, 20, 21, 31, 55, 213, 2334, 430

Separate by thousands:

  • zeros: 0005, 0020, 0021, 0031, 0055, 0213, 0430

  • ones:

  • twos: 2334

  • threes:

  • fours:

  • fives:

    Back together: 5, 20, 21, 31, 55, 213, 430, 2334

You are now done. I saw a nice code for this on Geekviewpoint both in Java and in python

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2  
Wow! That's a lot of details. You really went for it there. Great job. +1 –  kasavbere Feb 6 '13 at 2:58
3  
@kasavbere I have great appreciation for stackoverflow and a lot of respect for people who ask for help. –  Konsol Labapen Feb 6 '13 at 4:56
1  
number 31 is lost after units cycle. –  rudym Apr 10 at 7:34

Think of a deck of cards. You first sort it by suit in four piles. Then you put those four piles on top of one another and now sort into 13 piles based on rank. Put those together and you now have a sorted deck.

share|improve this answer
    
"sort .. based on rank" is a poor analogy for a radix sort as it implies comparison while ordering. e.g.: when I sort a suite of cards by hand, I put a 4 before the 9, then a 5 after the 4 but before the 9 and a 3 before the 4, etc .. –  user166390 Feb 5 '13 at 21:55
    
@pst: Please elaborate - how does it imply ordering? –  500 - Internal Server Error Feb 5 '13 at 21:57
    
It implies comparison while ordering. Analogies model real life - and in this case, as per the operation I described, the analogy diverges from what it is trying to describe. The first part, about the four piles is what a Radix sort is about, only with one restriction: the piles are always ranged in a specific order. (And this order is because someone said it was so, and not because of any comparison between the decks.) –  user166390 Feb 5 '13 at 21:57
    
Ah, it doesn't for me :) –  500 - Internal Server Error Feb 5 '13 at 21:58
    
I guess it can be read both ways (and I'm not entirely sure of my reading): +1, but it would be nice to see this answer flushed out more. –  user166390 Feb 5 '13 at 22:04

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