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I have a base Message class, and around 100 different subtype classes of Message that represent each type of message that can be processed. What I am currently considering doing is using a giant switch statement to create the message object. For example:

switch (MsgType)
{
   case MessageType.ChatMsg:
      Msg = new MsgChat(Buf);
      break;
   case MessageType.ResultMsg:
      Msg = new MsgResult(Buf);
      break;
   ... // 98 more case statements
}
Msg.ProcessMsg(); // Use a polymorphic call to process the message.

Is there a better way to do this? If so, can you show an easy code example.

EDIT

So, I tried doing this:

public class Test
{
   public Test()
   {
      IEnumerable<Type> myEnumerable = GetTypesWith<MyAttribute>(true);
   }

   IEnumerable<Type> GetTypesWith<TAttribute>(bool inherit)
      where TAttribute : System.Attribute
   {
      return from a in AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies()
             from t in a.GetTypes()
             where t.IsDefined(typeof(TAttribute), inherit)
             select t;
   }
}

This appears to work in that myEnumerable now contains all 100 of the message subtypes, plus the base Message type as well. However, while I don't mind using reflection at the beginning of the program to load the types, using it to access the proper object in real time might be too slow. So, I would like to try out using a delegate.

The example in the comment below from @Mark Hildreth:

"So, you'd have a dictionary of >. Then, your mappings would be mappings[MessageType.ChatMsg] = x => new MsgChat(x);"

There are a couple of ways to interpret this code. One idea is to remove all 100 subclasses and just use one massive class with 100 delegate methods. That is a distant 2nd choice. The other idea and my first choice is for the above code to somehow create a message subclass object. But, I don't quite understand how it would do this. Also, it would be nice to keep the above technique in my Test class of getting all the types or delegates without having to write all 100 of them. Can you or anyone else explain how this can be done?

share|improve this question
    
why do you need 100 classes when a classe with a type property may be enough ? –  tschmit007 Feb 5 '13 at 22:14
    
To take advantage of polymorphism and to spread the intelligence of the system horizontally. –  Bob Bryan Feb 6 '13 at 1:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Instead using a giant switch statement, you can define a Dictionary to map each MessageType value to its defined Message derived class and creates an instance using this mapping data.

Dictionary definition:

Dictionary<int, Type> mappings = new Dictionary<int, Type>();
mappings.Add(MessageType.ChatMsg, typeof(MsgChat));
mappings.Add(MessageType.ResultMsg, typeof(MsgResult));

...

Dictionary consumption:

ConstructorInfo ctor = mappings[MessageType.ChatMsg].GetConstructor(new[] { typeof(Buf) });
Message message = (Message)ctor.Invoke(new object[] { Buf });

Note that I don't compiled this code to verify if is correct or not. I only want to show you the idea.

EDIT

There is my new answer to improve the first one. I'm thinking on your edited question, using given ideas from @MikeSW and @Mark Hildreth.

public class FactoryMethodDelegateAttribute : Attribute
{
    public FactoryMethodDelegateAttribute(Type type, string factoryMethodField, Message.MessageType typeId)
    {
        this.TypeId = typeId;
        var field = type.GetField(factoryMethodField);
        if (field != null)
        {
            this.FactoryMethod = (Func<byte[], Message>)field.GetValue(null);
        }
    }

    public Func<byte[], Message> FactoryMethod { get; private set; }
    public Message.MessageType TypeId { get; private set; }
}

public class Message
{
    public enum MessageType
    {
        ChatMsg,
    }
}

[FactoryMethodDelegate(typeof(ChatMsg), "FactoryMethodDelegate", Message.MessageType.ChatMsg)]
public class ChatMsg : Message
{
    public static readonly MessageType MessageTypeId = MessageType.ChatMsg;
    public static readonly Func<byte[], Message> FactoryMethodDelegate = buffer => new ChatMsg(buffer);
    public ChatMsg(byte[] buffer)
    {
        this.Buffer = buffer;
    }

    private byte[] Buffer { get; set; }
 }

public class TestClass
{
    private IEnumerable<Type> GetTypesWith<TAttribute>(bool inherit) where TAttribute : Attribute
    {
        return from a in AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies()
               from t in a.GetTypes()
               where t.IsDefined(typeof(TAttribute), inherit)
               select t;
    }

    [Test]
    public void Test()
    {
        var buffer = new byte[1];
        var mappings = new Dictionary<Message.MessageType, Func<byte[], Message>>();
        IEnumerable<Type> types = this.GetTypesWith<FactoryMethodDelegateAttribute>(true);
        foreach (var type in types)
        {
            var attribute =
                (FactoryMethodDelegateAttribute)
                type.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(FactoryMethodDelegateAttribute), true).First();

            mappings.Add(attribute.TypeId, attribute.FactoryMethod);
        }

        var message = mappings[Message.MessageType.ChatMsg](buffer);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
This is the general idea I would use. However, I would recommend avoiding the reflection by using a function as the value of the dictionary. So, you'd have a dictionary of <MessageType, Func<Buffer, Message>>. Then, your mappings would be mappings[MessageType.ChatMsg] = x => new MsgChat(x); –  Mark Hildreth Feb 5 '13 at 22:25
2  
Also, keep in mind that something like this could be more easily automated by adding attributes onto your Message classes, and using code to find all those classes and build the dictionary automatically. See this question on how to search for attributes. –  Mark Hildreth Feb 5 '13 at 22:30
    
Very interesting. So, it sounds like I should be able to specify an attribute in the base class along with the Inherited = True switch so that all the subclasses will pick it up. Then maybe specify a 2nd attribute in the base class so that the base class won't be picked up by the GetTypesWith method defined in your link. One question though, is Func<Buffer, Message> defining a generic delegate method with 2 parameters, or just one? All my subclass constructors would just take one parameter - Buffer, which is defined as a Byte array. I'm not sure what the 2nd parameter would be for. –  Bob Bryan Feb 5 '13 at 23:31
    
The last type defined on Func<Buffer, Message> is the return type of the Func<T, TResult> delegate. MSDN –  HuorSwords Feb 6 '13 at 9:22
    
Thanks. Just tried debugging through your code and it works nicely. –  Bob Bryan Feb 6 '13 at 17:30

You're on a right track and using a dictionary is a good idea. If reflection is too slow you can use expressions, like this (I'm assuming you decorate the Messages classes with a MessageTypeAttribute).

public class Test
{
 public Test()
  {
     var dict=new Dictionary<MessageType,Func<Buffer,Mesage>>();
     var types=from a in AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies()
         from t in a.GetTypes()
         where t.IsDefined(MessageTypeAttribute, inherit)
         select t;
    foreach(var t in types) {
      var attr = t.GetCustomAttributes(typeof (MessageTypeAttribute), false).First();
       dict[attr.MessageType] = CreateFactory(t);
       }

      var msg=dict[MessageType.Chat](Buf);
  }

 Func<Buffer,Message> CreateFactory(Type t)
 {
      var arg = Expression.Parameter(typeof (Buffer));
        var newMsg = Expression.New(t.GetConstructor(new[] {typeof (Buffer)}),arg);
        return Expression.Lambda<Func<Buffer, Message>>(newMsg, arg).Compile();
}

}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting idea, but I see that your code has a Compile method in their. Don't know if that would necessarily be any better than reflection. What I am looking at right now, is to simply get rid of the 100 classes I wrote and replace them with methods. Message would then turn into something of a super class, but it would support static linking and would be the most efficient way to handle messages coming off and going to the wire. –  Bob Bryan Feb 6 '13 at 13:52
    
It is better than reflection as it's light code generation. it's almost as fast as writing manually new Message(buf). The compile() is invoked only once to create the Func<>. Once created, it's just like any other Func. I'm using a similar approach for generating mapping code for SqlFu (my microOrm) and it's FAST. IMHO it wouldn't be a wise approach to combine those classes into one giant class. The multiple class approach is scalable and the code above works for 1 or for 1000 classes without change. –  MikeSW Feb 6 '13 at 14:16

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