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I've read this stackoverflow question and I'm am succesful in redirecting stdout. But the way the mentioned code works, I completely loose my terminal meaning I can't print anything on it.

What I want to achieve is format the output of my program (which will use some code of mine and some libraries I can't modify) with ncurses, and have a window in which any spurious printf will show.

Is there a way I can achieve this?

    saved_stdout = dup(STDOUT_FILENO);  /* save stdout for display later $

    if( pipe(out_pipe) != 0 ) {          /* make a pipe */
        exit(1);
    }

    dup2(out_pipe[1], STDOUT_FILENO);   /* redirect stdout to the pipe */
    close(out_pipe[1]);

    initscr();                      /* Start curses mode            */

This way I can't print anything at all on the screen.

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1 Answer 1

To attain what I wanted I had to solve a problem: all output functions use STDOUT by default, and for most of them there is no way I can alter this behaviour (think an embbeded printf in a lib I don't have the sources for, or ncurses itself).

So if you modify STDOUT everything is going to be affected.

But I want my program to retain control of STDOUT. So somehow you have to separate what gets the real STDOUT and what gets the fake STDOUT. Separate sounds much like fork... So fork it is.

Essentially you fork all the bulk of the program in a child process for which you modify the STDOUT piping it away. The parent process maintains control of STDOUT and is able to read the pipe and do whatever it wants with the data in it.

#include <ncurses.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#define MAX_LEN 99

WINDOW *create_newwin(int height, int width, int starty, int startx, int vert, int horz);

char buffer[MAX_LEN+1] = {0};
int out_pipe[2];
int saved_stdout;

volatile sig_atomic_t s_interrupted = 0;
volatile sig_atomic_t alarm_expired = 0;


static void s_signal_handler (int signal_value)
{
    if (signal_value == SIGTERM || signal_value == SIGSTOP || signal_value == SIGINT)
        s_interrupted = 1;
    if (signal_value == SIGALRM)
        //signal(SIGALRM,alarm_wakeup);
        alarm_expired = 1;
}

static void s_catch_signals (void)
{
    struct sigaction action;
    action.sa_handler = s_signal_handler;
    action.sa_flags = 0;
    sigemptyset (&action.sa_mask);
    sigaction (SIGINT, &action, NULL);
    sigaction (SIGTERM, &action, NULL);
    sigaction (SIGALRM, &action, NULL);
}

int main (int arg, char **argv) {

    const char mesg[]="Testing stdout redirection";
    WINDOW *my_win, *my_win2;
    int cycle = 0, pid, p[2], row, col;

if(pipe(p) == -1)
{
    perror("pipe call error");
    return(1);
}

    switch (pid=fork())
    {
        case -1: perror("error: fork call");
            return(2);

        case 0:  /* if child then write down pipe */
            if(dup2(p[1], 1) == -1 ) /* stdout == write end of the pipe */
            {
                perror( "dup2 failed" );
                return(1);
            }
            s_catch_signals ();
            setvbuf(stdout, NULL, _IOLBF, 1000);
            while(!s_interrupted)
            {
                printf("Test %d\n",cycle);
                cycle++;
                usleep(10000);
            }
            printf("\n\tChild quitting cleanly\n\n");
            break;
        default:
            s_catch_signals ();
            std::string mystr;
            if(dup2(p[0], 0 ) == -1 ) /* stdin == read end of the pipe */
            {
                perror( "dup2 failed" );
                return(1);
            }
            initscr();              /* start the curses mode */
            getmaxyx(stdscr,row,col);       /* get the number of rows and columns */
            mvprintw(row/2,(col-strlen(mesg))/2,"%s",mesg);
                            /* print the message at the center of the screen */

            refresh();
            my_win2 = create_newwin(10,col,row-10, 0, 0, 0);    
            wrefresh(my_win2);
            my_win = create_newwin(8,col-2,row-9, 1, ' ', ' ');
            wrefresh(my_win);
            wprintw(my_win,"This screen has %d rows and %d columns\n",row,col);
            wprintw(my_win,"Try resizing your window(if possible) and then run this program again\n");
            scrollok(my_win,TRUE);
            int myy,myx;
            std::stringstream ss;
            while(!s_interrupted)
            {
                while( std::getline(std::cin, mystr) )
                {
                    ss.clear();
                    ss << mystr << std::endl;
                    mystr = ss.str();
                    waddstr(my_win,mystr.c_str());
                    wrefresh(my_win);
                }
                usleep(100000);

            }
            endwin();


            break;
    }
    endwin();
    printf("\n\tProgram quitting cleanly\n\n");
    return (EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

WINDOW *create_newwin(int height, int width, int starty, int startx, int vert, int horz)
{   WINDOW *local_win;

    local_win = newwin(height, width, starty, startx);
    box(local_win, vert , horz);        /* 0, 0 gives default characters 
                     * for the vertical and horizontal
                     * lines            */
    wrefresh(local_win);        /* Show that box        */

    return local_win;
}

This program shows exactly this behaviour: the main spawns a child which redirects its own STDOUT to a pipe. This pipe is then read by the parent which outputs it inside a controlled window. The rest of the screen is free to be manipulated by the parent however it is necessary.

switch (pid=fork())
{
    case 0:  /* if child then write down pipe */
        if(dup2(p[1], 1) == -1 ) /* stdout == write end of the pipe */
        {
            perror( "dup2 failed" );
            return(1);
        }

When the fork is called, if we are the child (pid==0) then take the pipe we created before, and switch our own STDOUT to the write end of this pipe.

setvbuf(stdout, NULL, _IOLBF, 1000);

Change the buffering mode to line, so that our parent can grab it more easily.

while(!s_interrupted)
{
    printf("Test %d\n",cycle);
    cycle++;
    usleep(10000);
}

Generate some simple text to check it works.

    switch (pid=fork())
    {
        default:
        if(dup2(p[0], 0 ) == -1 ) /* stdin == read end of the pipe */
        {
            perror( "dup2 failed" );
            return(1);
        }

If we are the parent, setup our STDIN to the read end of the pipe we created earlier.

    initscr();              /* start the curses mode */
    getmaxyx(stdscr,row,col);       /* get the number of rows and columns */
    mvprintw(row/2,(col-strlen(mesg))/2,"%s",mesg);
                    /* print the message at the center of the screen */

    refresh();
    my_win2 = create_newwin(10,col,row-10, 0, 0, 0);    
    wrefresh(my_win2);
    my_win = create_newwin(8,col-2,row-9, 1, ' ', ' ');
    wrefresh(my_win);
    wprintw(my_win,"This screen has %d rows and %d columns\n",row,col);
    wprintw(my_win,"Try resizing your window(if possible) and then run this program again\n");
    scrollok(my_win,TRUE);

Init ncurses and create some windows. We use my_win2 to draw a border, and the borderless my_win to actually contain the data. Moreover we set my_win to auto-scroll so that we can continue printing on it without worrying about ending out of space.

        while( std::getline(std::cin, mystr) )
        {
            ss.clear();
            ss << mystr << std::endl;
            mystr = ss.str();
            waddstr(my_win,mystr.c_str());
            wrefresh(my_win);
        }
        usleep(100000);

In a relaxedly paced cycle we check our STDIN, and if we have new lines we just add them to our scrolling window. so that when our process is scheduled in active state, we take the time to process a whole lot of output instead of polling repeatedly.

This proves to be a working solution to the proposed problem.

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