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I have the following method that returns an XmlReader:

public XmlReader RequestXML(string endpoint)
{
    using (WebClient request = this.PrepareRequest(RestMethod.GET, null))
    {
        byte[] response = request.DownloadData(this.RestUrl + endpoint);
        using (MemoryStream responseStream = new MemoryStream(response))
        {
            XmlReader xReader = XmlReader.Create(responseStream);
            return xReader;
        }
    }
}

But, of course, this doesn't work because the MemoryStream is closed before the calling code has a chance to use the XmlReader. Is it possible to return an XmlReader and still dispose its underlying MemoryStream?

I've considered accepting a delegate (or Action<XmlReader>) as the second argument in my method to do the work within the using, but that design seems a bit awkward.

Also, I can't just call WebClient.DownloadString().

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why dont u declare XmlReader xReader outside the inner using –  Dan Hunex Feb 5 '13 at 23:30
1  
@Dan, that won't make any difference. The point is that XmlReader is consumed outside of RequestXML. That being said, MemoryStream.Dispose() doesn't really do anything, so IMO the question is a bit moot. –  Kirk Woll Feb 5 '13 at 23:32
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If in doubt use XmlReaderSettings.CloseInput with this overload: XmlReader.Create(Stream, XmlReaderSettings), like this ...

public XmlReader RequestXML(string endpoint)
{
    using (WebClient request = this.PrepareRequest(RestMethod.GET, null))
    {
        byte[] response = request.DownloadData(this.RestUrl + endpoint);
        MemoryStream responseStream = new MemoryStream(response);
        XmlReaderSettings xmlReaderSettings = new XmlReaderSettings();
        xmlReaderSettings.CloseInput = true;
        return XmlReader.Create(responseStream, xmlReaderSettings);
    }
}

This way code that calls RequestXml need not be responsible for disposing of the MemoryStream.

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Brilliant. This is just what I was looking for. –  gilly3 Feb 6 '13 at 0:33
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