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I'm attempting to run some fairly deep recursive code in R and it keeps giving me this error:

Error: C stack usage is too close to the limit

My output from CStack_info() is:

Cstack_info()
    size    current  direction eval_depth 
67108864       8120          1          2 

I have plenty of memory on my machine, I'm just trying to figure out how I can increase the CStack for R.

EDIT: Someone asked for a reproducible example. Here's some basic sample code that causes the problem. Running f(1,1) a few times you'll get the error. Note that I've already set --max-ppsize = 500000 and options(expressions=500000) so if you don't set those you might get an error about one of those two things instead. As you can see, the recursion can go pretty deep here and I've got no idea how to get it to work consistently. Thanks.

f <- function(root=1,lambda=1) {
    x <- c(0,1);
    prob <- c(1/(lambda+1),lambda/(lambda+1));
        repeat {
      if(root == 0) {
        break;
      }
      else {
        child <- sample(x,2,replace=TRUE,prob);
        if(child[1] == 0 && child[2] == 0) {
          break;
        }
        if(child[1] == 1) {
          child[1] <- f(root=child[1],lambda);
        }
        if(child[2] == 1 && child[1] == 0) {
          child[2] <- f(root=child[2],lambda);
        }
      }
      if(child[1] == 0 && child[2] == 0) {
        break;
      }
      if(child[1] == 1 || child[2] == 1) {
        root <- sample(x,1,replace=TRUE,prob);
      }
        }
    return(root)
}
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This question suggests perhaps options(expressions = somethinglarge) –  mnel Feb 6 '13 at 0:18
    
@mnel The expression nesting depth, the pointer protection stack, and the C stack are three separate (but related) things. –  Zack Feb 6 '13 at 0:21
    
Thanks so much for your prompt response, Zack. I think that your answer may be for a Linux OS though? I'm currently running Windows 7 64 bit, does that change things at all? Thanks again for any help. –  user2045093 Feb 6 '13 at 1:31
    
My answer should be valid for any Unix variant (of which Linux and OSX are the most common nowadays) but ... yeah, I have no idea what the Windows equivalent is. –  Zack Feb 6 '13 at 1:51
1  
Googling the error message shows that in the past this has usually been an error in user code, so you should probably reduce your problem to a simple reproducible example and post that here. –  Martin Morgan Feb 6 '13 at 2:52

2 Answers 2

The stack size is an operating system parameter, adjustable per-process (see setrlimit(2)). You can't adjust it from within R as far as I can tell, but you can adjust it from the shell before starting R, with the ulimit command. It works like this:

$ ulimit -s # print default
8192
$ R --slave -e 'Cstack_info()["size"]'
   size 
8388608

8388608 = 1024 * 8192; R is printing the same value as ulimit -s, but in bytes instead of kilobytes.

$ ulimit -s 16384 # enlarge stack limit to 16 megs
$ R --slave -e 'Cstack_info()["size"]'
    size 
16777216 
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1  
...or just set it to unlimited. –  Paul Hiemstra Feb 7 '13 at 6:42

I suspect that, regardless of stack limit, you'll end up with recursions that are too deep. For instance, with lambda = Inf, f(1) leads to an immediate recursion, indefinitely. The depth of the recursion seems to be a random walk, with some probability r of going deeper, 1 - r of finishing the current recursion. By the time you've hit the stack limit, you've made a large number of steps 'deeper'. This implies that r > 1 / 2, and the very large majority of time you'll just continue to recurse.

Also, it seems like it is almost possible to derive an analytic or at least numerical solution even in the face of infinite recursion. One can define p as the probability that f(1) == 1, write implicit expressions for the 'child' states after a single iteration, and equate these with p, and solve. p can then be used as the chance of success in a single draw from a binomial distribution.

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