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How do you think what is the best way to find position in the System.Stream where given byte sequence starts (first occurence):

public static long FindPosition(Stream stream, byte[] byteSequence)
{
    long position = -1;

    /// ???
    return position;
}

P.S. The simpliest yet fastest solution is preffered. :)

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your question is confusing...what are you looking for? that specific sequence of bytes in the stream? –  dharga Sep 24 '09 at 14:16
    
I think the question's title should be updated. Stream is misspelled as Steam, which makes it seem like a question that should be tagged Valve. –  chollida Sep 24 '09 at 14:17
    
@chollida: Actually, I came to this question just to fix that. –  Powerlord Sep 24 '09 at 14:18
    
Actually i'm looking for guid in the stream. –  sh0gged Sep 24 '09 at 14:40
    
is memory an issue? or can you read the whole stream into an array of bytes? –  dharga Sep 24 '09 at 16:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I've reached this solution.

I did some benchmarks with an ASCII file that was 3.050 KB and 38803 lines. With a search byte array of 22 bytes in the last line of the file I've got the result in about 2.28 seconds (in a slow/old machine).

public static long FindPosition(Stream stream, byte[] byteSequence)
{
    if (byteSequence.Length > stream.Length)
        return -1;

    byte[] buffer = new byte[byteSequence.Length];

    using (BufferedStream bufStream = new BufferedStream(stream, byteSequence.Length))
    {
        int i;
        while ((i = bufStream.Read(buffer, 0, byteSequence.Length)) == byteSequence.Length)
        {
            if (byteSequence.SequenceEqual(buffer))
                return bufStream.Position - byteSequence.Length;
            else
                bufStream.Position -= byteSequence.Length - PadLeftSequence(buffer, byteSequence);
        }
    }

    return -1;
}

private static int PadLeftSequence(byte[] bytes, byte[] seqBytes)
{
    int i = 1;
    while (i < bytes.Length)
    {
        int n = bytes.Length - i;
        byte[] aux1 = new byte[n];
        byte[] aux2 = new byte[n];
        Array.Copy(bytes, i, aux1, 0, n);
        Array.Copy(seqBytes, aux2, n);
        if (aux1.SequenceEqual(aux2))
            return i;
        i++;
    }
    return i;
}
share|improve this answer
    
For future reference, PadLeftSequence is searching for the first non-matching byte which caused SequenceEqual to return false. It seems like a micro-optimisation to me, since one would expect SequenceEqual to early-return on a non-match anyway. Disclaimer: I have not done any measurements, this is only opinion. –  Tullo May 31 '12 at 23:33

Bit old question, but here's my answer. I've found that reading blocks and then searching in that is extremely inefficient compared to just reading one at a time and going from there.

Also, IIRC, the accepted answer would fail if part of the sequence was in one block read and half in another - ex, given 12345, searching for 23, it would read 12, not match, then read 34, not match, etc... haven't tried it, though, seeing as it requires net 4.0. At any rate, this is way simpler, and likely much faster.

static long ReadOneSrch(Stream haystack, byte[] needle)
{
    int b;
    long i = 0;
    while ((b = haystack.ReadByte()) != -1)
    {
        if (b == needle[i++])
        {
            if (i == needle.Length)
                return haystack.Position - needle.Length;
        }
        else
            i = b == needle[0] ? 1 : 0;
    }

    return -1;
}
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your code is incorrect. consider haystack = [ 2,1,2,1,1 ], needle = [ 2,1,1 ]. Your code returns -1, but correct answer is 2 –  imaximchuk Jun 10 '13 at 23:06

If you treat the stream like another sequence of bytes, you can just search it like you were doing a string search. Wikipedia has a great article on that. Boyer-Moore is a good and simple algorithm for this.

Here's a quick hack I put together in Java. It works and it's pretty close if not Boyer-Moore. Hope it helps ;)

public static final int BUFFER_SIZE = 32;

public static int [] buildShiftArray(byte [] byteSequence){
	int [] shifts = new int[byteSequence.length];
	int [] ret;
	int shiftCount = 0;
	byte end = byteSequence[byteSequence.length-1];
	int index = byteSequence.length-1;
	int shift = 1;

	while(--index >= 0){
		if(byteSequence[index] == end){
			shifts[shiftCount++] = shift;
			shift = 1;
		} else {
			shift++;
		}
	}
	ret = new int[shiftCount];
	for(int i = 0;i < shiftCount;i++){
		ret[i] = shifts[i];
	}
	return ret;
}

public static byte [] flushBuffer(byte [] buffer, int keepSize){
	byte [] newBuffer = new byte[buffer.length];
	for(int i = 0;i < keepSize;i++){
		newBuffer[i] = buffer[buffer.length - keepSize + i];
	}
	return newBuffer;
}

public static int findBytes(byte [] haystack, int haystackSize, byte [] needle, int [] shiftArray){
	int index = needle.length;
	int searchIndex, needleIndex, currentShiftIndex = 0, shift;
	boolean shiftFlag = false;

	index = needle.length;
	while(true){
		needleIndex = needle.length-1;
		while(true){
			if(index >= haystackSize)
				return -1;
			if(haystack[index] == needle[needleIndex])
				break;
			index++;
		}
		searchIndex = index;
		needleIndex = needle.length-1;
		while(needleIndex >= 0 && haystack[searchIndex] == needle[needleIndex]){
			searchIndex--;
			needleIndex--;
		}
		if(needleIndex < 0)
			return index-needle.length+1;
		if(shiftFlag){
			shiftFlag = false;
			index += shiftArray[0];
			currentShiftIndex = 1;
		} else if(currentShiftIndex >= shiftArray.length){
			shiftFlag = true;
			index++;
		} else{
			index += shiftArray[currentShiftIndex++];
		}			
	}
}

public static int findBytes(InputStream stream, byte [] needle){
	byte [] buffer = new byte[BUFFER_SIZE];
	int [] shiftArray = buildShiftArray(needle);
	int bufferSize, initBufferSize;
	int offset = 0, init = needle.length;
	int val;

	try{
		while(true){
			bufferSize = stream.read(buffer, needle.length-init, buffer.length-needle.length+init);
			if(bufferSize == -1)
				return -1;
			if((val = findBytes(buffer, bufferSize+needle.length-init, needle, shiftArray)) != -1)
				return val+offset;
			buffer = flushBuffer(buffer, needle.length);
			offset += bufferSize-init;
			init = 0;
		}
	} catch (IOException e){
		e.printStackTrace();
	}
	return -1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
it might not be simplest, but it's pretty fast. it think given the constraints of reading from a stream doesn't allow for simple if you want speed. but I hope my code can alleviate some of your troubles, or be of help to someone in the future. –  dharga Sep 24 '09 at 19:42

You'll basically need to keep a buffer the same size as byteSequence so that once you've found that the "next byte" in the stream matches, you can check the rest but then still go back to the "next but one" byte if it's not an actual match.

It's likely to be a bit fiddly whatever you do, to be honest :(

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