Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was writing a program in Lisp to put the common elements from two lists into a new one. Here is my code.

(defun test (a b)
  (let ((alist nil) (blist nil))
    (progn
      (join a b alist blist)
      (print blist))))

(defun join (a b alist blist)
  (cond
   ((and (null a) (null b))
    (setf blist (cons alist blist)))
   ((equal (car a) (car b))
    (setf alist (cons (list (car a) (car b)) alist)))
   (t (join (cdr a) (cdr b) alist blist))))

But the output of the function is alwaysnil. Then I looked up something on Internet and found out that when I try to use setf, it no longer points to the original list, instead it points to a new one. So if I cannot use setf, what else can I use to implement this?

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure what your function really is supposed to do. Do you want your result to hold elements that are at the same position in two input lists, or do you want some kind of intersection? If the latter, what about duplicates? –  danlei Feb 6 '13 at 1:51
    
I agree with daniel - this is a confusing function. Can you give some examples of function calls and expected output? Also, if the function joins two lists together, why does it take four arguments? –  zck Feb 6 '13 at 5:19
    
you should always use proper indented Lisp code. –  Rainer Joswig Feb 6 '13 at 8:56

2 Answers 2

(defun test (a b)
  (let ((alist nil) (blist nil))   ; two variables initialized to NIL
    (progn                         ; this PROGN is not needed
      (join a b alist blist)       ; you call a function, but ignore the
                                   ; return value? Why?
      (print blist))))             ; since blist was never modified, this
                                   ; can only be the initial value, NIL



(defun join (a b alist blist)      ; four new local variables
  (cond
   ((and (null a) (null b))
    (setf blist (cons alist blist)))    ; why do you set the variable BLIST?
                                        ; you never use it later

   ((equal (car a) (car b))
    (setf alist (cons (list (car a) (car b)) alist)))
                                        ; why do you set the variable ALIST?
                                        ; you never use it later

   (t (join (cdr a) (cdr b) alist blist))))
                                        ; the only recursive call of JOIN

You can only change variables, which are lexically reachable.

share|improve this answer

Don't use "output" arguments in Lisp. Better return the result from the function. Also, there is a function 'intersection' in CL which does what you want, so please use it unless it is an exercise (then you can look up its implementation).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.