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public class ConcreteService1: IService1
{
private IService2 _service2;
public void doSomething()
{
   _service2 = new ConcreteService2();
 .....
}


}

 public class ConcreateService2: IService2
{
private IService1 _service1;
public void doSomething()
{
 _service1 = new ConcreteService1();
 .....
 }

}

Is this is the situation that Factory or Abstract factory can be used here. If yes can you please provide an example.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In your case as you have two classes with two different interfaces then Factory really doesn't apply here. you should use abstract factory as its an object and which delegates the object initialization to its separate functions.

Abstract Factory Interface for your example goes here

public Interface IAbstractInterfaceFactory
{

IService1 InitializeService1();
IService2 InitializeService2();

}

Factory pattern is used generally when you have too many different object initialization implementing same interface or abstract class. The pattern suggest to have a Factory method and based on type of object need to be initialized it creates the specific object and return it. It helps in two ways 1. Keeps all the initialization code at one place 2. It never returns the concrete class which makes it more extendable and manageable

For more information please see this links Differences between Abstract Factory Pattern and Factory Method http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abstract_factory_pattern http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/68670/The-Factory-Pattern http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factory_method_pattern

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Thanks for the answer. Really helped me. Just a related question is that, I went through many examples of abstract factory and observe that in almost all examples AbstractFactory is implemented by more than on ConcreteFactories. As in my case I don't see more that one concreteFactory, will it be correct implementation of Abstract factory pattern. –  user2045038 Feb 6 '13 at 7:26
    
It depends because this could be a situation now but at later stage if you introduce new interfaces then it can be easily handled by your abstract factory. I guess you will have two concrete factories now one for IService1 and other for Iservice2 as both are totally independent –  sumeet kumar Feb 6 '13 at 13:18
    
I am still not able to understand why in this case I need to create two concrete factories. As one can do the job like: public class ConcreateServiceFactory: IAbstractInterfaceFactory { public IService1 InitializeService1(){....} public IService2 InitializeService2(){....}} Can you please explain. –  user2045038 Feb 6 '13 at 15:27
    
i meant InitializeService1() and InitializeService2() to delegate to two different concrete implementation which will return concrete objects of Iservice1 and Iservice2. –  sumeet kumar Feb 6 '13 at 16:10
    
So you mean if there are n independent objects, then I have to create n concrete factories. Also in this approach what is the benefit as compare to having one concrete factory. –  user2045038 Feb 6 '13 at 16:33
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