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Write a method counts that accepts a List of integers and a Set of integers as parameters, and returns a map from each value in the set to the number of occurrences of that value in the list.

My solution #1:

public static Map<Integer, Integer> counts(List<Integer> list, Set<Integer> set) {
    Map<Integer, Integer> map = new TreeMap<Integer, Integer>();
    Iterator<Integer> i = list.iterator();

    for(Integer element : set) {
        int count = 0;
        for(Integer sub : list) {
            if(sub == element) {
                count++;
            }
        }
        map.put(element, count);
    }

    return map;
}

My solution #2:

public static Map<Integer, Integer> counts(List<Integer> list, Set<Integer> set) {
    Map<Integer, Integer> map = new TreeMap<Integer, Integer>();
    Iterator<Integer> i = list.iterator();

    for(Integer element : set) {
        int count = 0;
        while(i.hasNext()) {
            if(i.next() == element) {
                count++;
            }
        }
        map.put(element, count);
    }

    return map;
}

Input:

list: [4, -2, 3, 9, 4, 17, 5, 29, 14, 87, 4, -2, 100]
set: [-2, 4, 29]

Expected output:

{-2=2, 4=3, 29=1}

Output for #1:

{-2=2, 4=3, 29=1}

Output for #2:

{-2=0, 4=3, 29=0}

The first one works, but the second one does not. Why? They are essentially the same thing, or am I missing anything? Also, would using a for loop work to traverse through the list? If not, why?

share|improve this question
    
What do the different methods do or not do, what is your expected output? –  Serdalis Feb 6 '13 at 1:23
    
Are you sure you want to compare by reference? –  nhahtdh Feb 6 '13 at 1:25
    
In one case your iterator is impicitly declared inside the outer loop, in the other case it is explicitly declared outside... –  assylias Feb 6 '13 at 1:28
    
Doesn't answer your question but there's a better way to do it: Iterate through the List and for each element in the list you update your map if the set contains that element. (You would have to check for null values, or initialize your Map with for( Integer i : set ) map.put( i, 0 ); –  Danyel Feb 6 '13 at 1:43
    
@Danyel Thanks for the suggestion, but I fail to understand how/why this solution is better? –  user2027425 Feb 6 '13 at 1:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You forget to reset the iterator after each loop, try the following:

for(Integer element : set) {
    int count = 0;
    i = list.iterator(); // resets the iterator to the first element. 
    while(i.hasNext()) {
        if(i.next() == element) {
            count++;
        }
    } // by the end of this loop the iterator has no next elements, need to reset.
    map.put(element, count);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Confirmed to be working when this change is made. –  Eric Feb 6 '13 at 1:30

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