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While using the widget commands add_widget and clear_widgets, I am getting my widgets, which look fine by themselves, to be incredibly tiny on the bottom left corner of the screen.

I'm going to explain all my steps here, so please bear with me.

I have a system in place to switch from one Widget to another. The "Widget" is basically the entire form, the base canvas and layout.

As I understand it, these must have a base layout. So first I put a root element in, then I intiialze my UI Manager with this root.

class MyApp(App):
    rootForm = BoxLayout()
    ui = UserInterface(rootForm)
    return rootForm

My UI handles the switching of widgets. It holds all widgets in a list when it gets created. It also gives itself a reference back to the User Interface, for callback purposes.

class UserInterface():
    __WidgetDictionary = {}
    __RootWidget = None

    def __init__(self, inRootWidget):
        self.__RootWidget = inRootWidget # Keep track of our root
        # Generate two forms to be swapped in/out
        self.__WidgetDictionary["form1"] = FirstWidget()
        self.__WidgetDictionary["form1"].SetUIreference(self)

        self.__WidgetDictionary["form2"] = SecondWidget()
        self.__WidgetDictionary["form2"].SetUIReference(self)

        self.ChangeWidget("MainMenu")

ChangeWidget, the real heart here, cleans out the root widgets and adds in a new one.

def ChangeWidget(self, inWidgetName):
    self.__RootWidget.clear_widgets() # Clear out the widgets
    self.__RootWidget.add_widget( self.__WidgetDictionary[inWidgetName] ) # Add our new widget

This displays my form fine, with a button. When the button is clicked, it has a callback attached to change the form from Form1 to Form2.

#FirstWidget.py
class FirstWidget(BoxLayout):
    __UserInterfaceReference = None

    def SetUIReference(self, inUserInterface):
        self.__UserInterfaceReference = inUserInterface

    def ChangeWidget(self, inWidgetName):
        self.__UserInterfaceReference.ChangeWidget(inWidgetName)

The corresponding .kv file

#FirstWidget.kv
<FirstWidget>:      
    BoxLayout:
        orientation: 'vertical'
        padding: 50
        spacing: 10
    Button:
        on_release: root.ChangeWidget('form2')

Once the button is clicked, the error occurs. Form1 and Form2 are almost identical. Form2 has one butotn more than form2. The code fore Form1 and Form2 are exactly the same, except for the class name. Again, in it's own environment, form2 looks perfect.

Here is a screenshot of the bug: AddedWidgetMessedUp

EDIT: For the time being, I switched to using the Screen Manager: http://kivy.org/docs/api-kivy.uix.screenmanager.html

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1  
On your class, does it made a difference if you have a def build(self) which constructs the box layout/interface manager and then return rootForm. More generally I'd consider having your UserInterface subclass from BoxLayout, that way instead of calling self.__RootWidget.add_widget(blah) you can call self.add_widget(foo). –  Horba Feb 7 '13 at 9:35
    
You are omitting all the relevant part of the code, your KV language for MainMenuWidget suggests you are calling method ChangeWidget of that class, however you don't provide the py code for MainWidget class. Secondly even if the code is similar for completeness sake you should provide the .py and kv part of class Second Widget as for FirstWidget. As it is, one would have to mostly guess how things might have been written == not enough info. –  qua-non Feb 13 '13 at 1:45
    
@qua-non I had a wording mistake, MainMenuWidget was actually FirstWidget. I edited my code to reflect this. I omitted the second widget because it is the same, and to cut down the size of the post. –  MintyAnt Feb 13 '13 at 6:00
    
@Horba I'll give that a shot next chance I have. It would still be... fusterating if that was the case, to not just say 'object.add_widget', but I could bypass/hack it with 'object.add_widget_mymethod' which then calls 'self.add_widget' –  MintyAnt Feb 13 '13 at 6:02
    
Your code for MyApp is that what you are doing or did you forget to just type def build(self): when posting? –  qua-non Feb 13 '13 at 6:40

1 Answer 1

Combining the code above into one file If I run the following code::

from kivy.app import App
from kivy.uix.boxlayout import BoxLayout
from kivy.lang import Builder

Builder.load_string(
'''
<FirstWidget>:      
    BoxLayout:
        orientation: 'vertical'
        padding: 50
        spacing: 10
    Button:
        text: 'change to form 2'
        on_release: root.ChangeWidget('form2')

<SecondWidget>:
    TextInput:
    BubbleButton:
        text: 'change to form 1'
        on_release: root.ChangeWidget('form1')
''')

class UserInterface():
    __WidgetDictionary = {}
    __RootWidget = None

    def __init__(self, inRootWidget):
        self.__RootWidget = inRootWidget # Keep track of our root
        # Generate two forms to be swapped in/out
        self.__WidgetDictionary["form1"] = FirstWidget()
        self.__WidgetDictionary["form1"].SetUIReference(self)

        self.__WidgetDictionary["form2"] = SecondWidget()
        self.__WidgetDictionary["form2"].SetUIReference(self)
        self.ChangeWidget("form1")

    def ChangeWidget(self, inWidgetName):
         # Clear out the widgets
        self.__RootWidget.clear_widgets()
         # Add our new widget
        self.__RootWidget.add_widget(self.__WidgetDictionary[inWidgetName])


class FirstWidget(BoxLayout):
    __UserInterfaceReference = None

    def SetUIReference(self, inUserInterface):
        self.__UserInterfaceReference = inUserInterface

    def ChangeWidget(self, inWidgetName):
        self.__UserInterfaceReference.ChangeWidget(inWidgetName)

class SecondWidget(BoxLayout):
    __UserInterfaceReference = None

    def SetUIReference(self, inUserInterface):
        self.__UserInterfaceReference = inUserInterface

    def ChangeWidget(self, inWidgetName):
        self.__UserInterfaceReference.ChangeWidget(inWidgetName)


class MyApp(App):

    def build(self):
        rootForm = BoxLayout()
        ui = UserInterface(rootForm)
        return rootForm


if __name__ == '__main__':
    MyApp().run()

Everything just behaves as it's supposed to. Since you haven't provided your entire code it's difficult to ascertain where you went wrong and offer a explanation. Try and look at the differences between the code I posted and your own code to ascertain what you are doing differently.

Hope this helps.

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