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All my entities inherit from IValidatableObject. The problem I have is when I am saving an entity and this one contain a property that refer to another entity that is not fully loaded (it's not null, but contain only the object with the reference key inside), the code raise an error. The error is that the property (which refer to another entity) is not correctly validated. This is true because the object contain only the ID. Let me show you what I am talking about with a small example:

public class Exercise : BaseModel
{
    public LocalizedString Name { get; set; }
    public virtual Muscle Muscle { get; set; }

    public override IEnumerable<ValidationResult> Validate(ValidationContext validationContext)
    {
        if (Name==null)     {
            yield return new ValidationResult("Name is mandatory", new[] { "Name" });
            yield break;
        }

        if (Name.French == null || Name.French.Length < 3){
            yield return new ValidationResult("Exercise's French name must be over 3 characters");
        }

        if (Name.English == null || Name.English.Length < 3){
            yield return new ValidationResult("Exercise's English name must be over 3 characters");
        }

        if (Muscle == null){
            yield return new ValidationResult("Exercice must be assigned to a muscle");
        }
    }
}

public class Muscle : BaseModel
{
    public LocalizedString Name { get; set; }
    public ICollection<Exercise> Exercises { get; set; }
    public override IEnumerable<ValidationResult> Validate(ValidationContext validationContext)
    {
        if (Name == null){
            yield return new ValidationResult("Name is mandatory", new[] { "Name" });
            yield break;
        }

        if (Name.French == null || Name.French.Length < 3){
            yield return new ValidationResult("Muscle's French name must be over 3 characters");
        }

        if (Name.English == null || Name.English.Length < 3){
            yield return new ValidationResult("Muscle's English name must be over 3 characters");
        }
    }
}

//--- This is the code into the repository:
    public int Insert(Exercise entity)
    {

        if (entity.Muscle != null)
        {
            var localExercise = DatabaseContext.Set<Muscle>().Local.SingleOrDefault(e => e.Id == entity.Muscle.Id);
            if (localExercise!=null)
            {
                DatabaseContext.Set<Muscle>().Attach(entity.Muscle);
            }

        }
        DatabaseContext.Set<Exercise>().Add(entity);
        return DatabaseContext.SaveChanges();   
    }

I am saving the Exercise. The Exercise contains a Name and the Muscle is set with a valid ID but doesn't contain any name. This is why, the validation occur inside Entity Framework when I am saving that told me that the name is required for the Muscle object.

I do not need to have Muscle fully loaded because I just want to attach this one. I do not want to have inside Exercise a property "MuscleID". I really want to have this structure.

Can anyone tell me what I need to do to have the validation occur only on the saved entity and not on the foreign object?

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1 Answer 1

You should use a ViewModel between your controller and view. That way you can keep your model out of the equation. Than use AutoMapper to map the ViewModel properties to the Model on postback in your controller. A ViewModel can define your validation rules and implement IValidatableObject. You can also define all your ViewModels to NOT have underlying entities. This keeps superfluous entities and properties out of your view. Make sure you use AutoMapper to map the ViewModel to your Model after your if (ModelState.IsValid) check.

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I have ViewModel. This is ain't the question. The question is concerning the IValidatableObject of the Model. When the Model is saved, EF call automatically the interface for validation. –  Patrick Desjardins Feb 6 '13 at 23:46

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