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Given a filename of:

xxxx/2013-02/csv/Sales_1302040000-1302050000.zip

Can someone explain why regexp_matches returns null in this function:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_import_batch_date(filename text) 
RETURNS DATE AS
$BODY$    
DECLARE
    matches text[];
    result date;
BEGIN

    matches := regexp_matches(filename, E'Sales_(\\d{2})(\\d{2})(\\d{2})');    
    IF matches IS NOT NULL THEN
        result := format('%s-%s-%s', 2000 + matches[1]::int, matches[2], matches[3])::DATE;
        RETURN result;
    END IF;

    RAISE WARNING 'Unable to determine batch date from %', filename;

    RETURN NULL;

END;
$BODY$
  LANGUAGE plpgsql IMMUTABLE;

yet, works in the following anonymous function:

DO language plpgsql $$
DECLARE
    filename text := 'xxxx/2013-02/csv/Sales_1302040000-1302050000.zip';
    matches text[];
    result date;
BEGIN

    matches := regexp_matches(filename, E'Sales_(\\d{2})(\\d{2})(\\d{2})');    
    IF matches IS NOT NULL THEN
        result := format('%s-%s-%s', 2000 + matches[1]::int, matches[2], matches[3])::DATE;
        raise notice '%', result;
    END IF;

END;
$$;      

And the regexp_matches seems to work correctly in this query, but again, the function fails and returns null

SELECT
    regexp_matches('xxxx/2013-02/csv/Sales_1302040000-1302050000.zip', E'Sales_(\\d{2})(\\d{2})(\\d{2})'),
    get_import_batch_date('xxxx/2013-02/csv/Sales_1302040000-1302050000.zip');

Is there a bug in my code that I'm just not seeing (very possible and the most common answer) Or is there something I'm failing to do here?

I'm using PostgreSQL 9.1.6

Just a final note: given this filename, I want the function to return a date value of 2013-02-04

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Update:

The problem turned out to be a confusion over pgScript in pgAdmin. @David pressed F6 in the query tool of pgAdmin to run pgScript instead of F5 for running an SQL script. See the comments below.
The function itself is fine.

Simplified function

I can't reproduce your error (tested on Postgres 9.1.6, didn't return NULL), but I can offer you a much simpler version of your function that probably won't fail:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_import_batch_date(filename text, OUT result date)
  AS
$func$    
BEGIN
   result := ('20' || substring(filename, E'Sales_(\\d{6})'))::date;

   IF result IS NULL THEN
      RAISE WARNING 'Unable to determine batch date from %', filename;
   END IF;
END
$func$ LANGUAGE plpgsql IMMUTABLE;
  • Use an OUT parameter to simplify things.
  • No need for the rather complex regexp_matches() expression and the array conversion it entails. A simple substring() call does the job. Prepend 20 and you convert to date tight away. The format matches ISO 8601 date format which is valid in any locale. Your original version relies on that as well, just with added hyphens (-), which are optional.

    `'20130204'::date` works just as well as `'2013-02-04'::date`
    

  • No RETURN needed, the value of the OUT parameter result is returned automatically.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Erwin; Your answers are always great. But, probably a stupid question here. How can I use this function if I want to set a field value in an update statement? –  David S Feb 6 '13 at 3:26
    
@DavidS: Like UPDATE tbl SET date_col = get_import_batch_date('mystring...') WHERE tbl_id = ? ..? –  Erwin Brandstetter Feb 6 '13 at 3:28
    
Oh. I see. I feel dumb now. I was thinking of it like how I did out params in Pascal (many years ago) and I needed a variable to pass it. BUT, in either case, it doesn't work for me. I have no idea why. I cut and pasted the code exactly. Maybe it's time to watch a movie. –  David S Feb 6 '13 at 3:39
    
BTW, thanks for educating me on ISO 8601. I thought it had to be in the format of "YYYY-MM-DD". Definitely learned something there. –  David S Feb 6 '13 at 3:40
    
@DavidS: Don't feel dumb, this is a Q&A site. And my new version doesn't work for you, either? –  Erwin Brandstetter Feb 6 '13 at 3:42

Works here too: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!1/d084b/1

Are you sure that was exactly the filename passed into get_import_batch_date?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes; I'm pretty sure. I copied and pasted it, and triple checked it. Even got a cup of coffee to take my eyes off it for a while. Does it work if you create the function with the code above? –  David S Feb 6 '13 at 2:24
    
Seems to work OK - see second result here: sqlfiddle.com/#!1/888ca/1 –  Steve Chambers Feb 6 '13 at 3:12
    
WOW! Yep; it works for you on sqlfiddle. But, I cut and pasted that code and it does not work for me. What the $%#@? It seems like it has to be something that I'm doing. Gave you and upvote because of the work you did. Thanks! –  David S Feb 6 '13 at 3:22

Ok! I finally figured it out. I'm not sure WHY this happens, or what is going on, but I can at least fix it. The answer I'm posting here is actually based on Erwin's answer. His code (as usual) is way better than mine, but this works if anyone else ever has this EXTREMELY frustrating problem in the future.

Basically, I was playing around with it again tonight and it finally caught my eye what was going on. If I take this code:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_import_batch_date(in filename text, out result date) AS
$BODY$
DECLARE
BEGIN
   result := substring(filename, E'Sales_(\\d{6})')::date;
   IF result IS NULL THEN
      RAISE WARNING 'Unable to determine batch date from %', filename;
   END IF;   
END
$BODY$
  LANGUAGE plpgsql IMMUTABLE
  COST 100;

...and hit F6 to "run script", you get the following message back:

[QUERY    ] CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_import_batch_date(in filename text, out result date) AS
            $BODY$
            DECLARE
            BEGIN
               result := substring(filename, E'Sales_(\d{6})')::date;
               IF result IS NULL THEN
                  RAISE WARNING 'Unable to determine batch date from %', filename;
               END IF;   
            END
            $BODY$
              LANGUAGE plpgsql IMMUTABLE
              COST 100

Can you spot the critical issue? I couldn't last night, but did tonight. It is stripping out one of the "\" on the substring function.

This will cause the match to fail and NULL to be returned.

If you hit F5 or click the "Run" button the function, then it works fine. (which is probably what people were doing or maybe what SQLFiddle is doing (total guess here).

To get F6 to work for me, I had to change the line to:

   result := substring(filename, E'Sales_(\\\d{6})')::date;

So, that's what works for me. This feels like a bug somewhere. But, I don't know where. Maybe @Erwin can shed some light on this.

share|improve this answer
    
The explanation is rather simple. Prepare your forehead to be slapped. :) In pgAdmin (which you never mentioned!!) F6 is the keyboard shortcut to execute pgScript, which uses it's own syntax rules as a meta language. Check out: pgadmin.org/docs/1.16/pgscript.html#pgscript –  Erwin Brandstetter Feb 7 '13 at 4:19
    
Yeah; really weird. I didn't mention it because I never thought it would make a difference. Now I know better. :) It was about to drive me crazy last night. I couldn't figure out why everyone else was working. I bet I cut & pasted your solution 3 or 4 times. –  David S Feb 7 '13 at 4:24
    
Just remember to press F5 or hit the plain green arrow button in the SQL editor of pgAdmin to execute SQL commands. :) Or select some code and hit F5 to exeucte only the highlighted part. –  Erwin Brandstetter Feb 7 '13 at 4:27
    
But, what about when you need to drop the function because the signature has changed? I always have a "drop" when I'm working on a function. Or you need change the owner? I just have a script to do this and hit F6. I didn't know it could parse differently. I will say this, there might be an explanation for it, but this still feels really wrong. That a function can be created (and return completely different results) based on how it was executed. I get it, but it still feels really bad. –  David S Feb 7 '13 at 4:32
    
Slow down .. you are mixing at least 4 different things here. 1.) Owner is irrelevant. 2.) If the function signature doesn't change, you can update a function with CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION ..., else you have to drop and re-create it 3.) PostgreSQL allows function overloading. 4.) None of this has anything to do with pgScript, which is a feature of pgAdmin (I hardly ever use.) –  Erwin Brandstetter Feb 7 '13 at 4:37

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