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Let's say I have the following OpenMP region:

omp_set_num_threads(3);
#pragma omp parallel for
{
 //start
 ...
 //somewhere in the middle
 ...
 //end
}

Let's say I have 8-core system. For example, after "start" let's say thread 0 is running on core 4, thread 1 runs on core 5, and thread 2 runs on core 6. Is it possible "somewhere in the middle" before the "end" that threads migrate from their respective cores that they were assigned after "start"? I.e. is it possible that threads 0-2 are assigned to cores 4-5 after "start", and "somewhere in the middle" threads say migrate to cores 5-7, respectively? And will even be possible that threads may reside just before the "end" on cores 0-2? Thanks.

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It is not apparent from your question if you are asking for some sort of dynamic run-time control over the placement of threads or if your are just asking if it is possible in principle for threads to migrate to different cores while the parallel region executes. –  Hristo Iliev Feb 6 '13 at 10:12
    
@HristoIliev Second part, I was asking if it is possible in principle that threads migrate to different cores while the parallel region executes without explicitly asking to do so. Thanks. –  tiki Feb 6 '13 at 13:23
    
@torem Remember: with privileges come responsibilities. Maybe you want to check this link on comments (especially the part When shouldn't I comment?) –  Massimiliano Feb 6 '13 at 17:58
    
@Massimiliano Sorry, if I did anything wrong. I just wanted to know the exact situation. –  tiki Feb 6 '13 at 18:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To the best of my knowledge, OpenMP 3.1 specifications do not provide any means to re-bind threads.

In fact, the only way to have some control over thread binding is through the OMP_PROC_BIND environment variable:

The OMP_PROC_BIND environment variable sets the value of the global bind-var ICV. The value of this environment variable must be true or false. If the environment variable is set to true, the execution environment should not move OpenMP threads between processors. If the environment variable is set to false, the execution environment may move OpenMP threads between processors. The behavior of the program is implementation defined if the value of OMP_PROC_BIND is neither true nor false.

The OpenMP 4.0 draft extends the possible values of OMP_PROC_BIND and adds the OMP_PLACES environment variable, which permits to select how threads are bound to resources. Still, there is no standard way of re-binding the threads.

If this behavior is for you absolutely necessary, you may think of using the hwloc library, in particular the CPU binding part.

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So, in the last part it says that exec env may move OpenMP threads between processors (when OMP_PROC_BIND=false). How do I know what my implementation defines in case of OMP_PROC_BIND is neither true nor false? Thanks. –  tiki Feb 6 '13 at 13:27
1  
@torem, you should take a look at the documentation of your compiler in order understand what the default OpenMP behaviour is. For example, both GCC/libgomp and Intel OpenMP do not bind threads when OMP_PROC_BIND has no value set. –  Hristo Iliev Feb 6 '13 at 13:43
    
@HristoIliev Thanks a lot! –  tiki Feb 6 '13 at 16:46
    
@HristoIliev I looked at gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-4.7.2/gcc.pdf, also at gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/libgomp.pdf but nothing about OMP_PROC_BIND. Please could you give me a link? For example, my system gcc/gfortran --version shows 4.7.2. Thanks a lot!!! –  tiki Feb 6 '13 at 17:00
2  
It is badly documented but you can browse the source. If OMP_PROC_BIND is set to true and GOMP_CPU_AFFINITY is not set, then threads are bound in a linear way: thread 0 to CPU 0, thread 1 to CPU 1, etc. If GOMP_CPU_AFFINITY is also set, it gives the specific thread to core mapping. If OMP_PROC_BIND is not set or is set to false and GOMP_CPU_AFFINITY is not set, then the affinity mechanism is not initialised. If GOMP_CPU_AFFINITY is set, then thread binding is activated, no matter if OMP_PROC_BIND is set or not. –  Hristo Iliev Feb 6 '13 at 17:40

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