Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My aggregation needs vary among columns / data.frames. I would like to pass the "list" argument to the data.table dynamically.

As a minimal example:

require(data.table)
type <- c(rep("hello", 3), rep("bye", 3), rep("ok",3))
a <- (rep(1:3, 3))
b <- runif(9)
c <- runif(9)
df <- data.frame(cbind(type, a, b, c), stringsAsFactors=F)
DT <-data.table(df)

This call:

DT[, list(suma = sum(as.numeric(a)), meanb = mean(as.numeric(b)), minc = min(as.numeric(c))), by= type]

will have result similar to this:

    type suma     meanb      minc
1: hello    6 0.1332210 0.4265579
2:   bye    6 0.5680839 0.2993667
3:    ok    6 0.5694532 0.2069026

Future data.frames will have more columns that I will want to summarize differently. But for the sake of working with this small example: Is there a way to pass the list programatically?

I naïvely tried:

# create a different list
mylist <- "list(lengtha = length(as.numeric(a)), maxb = max(as.numeric(b)), meanc = mean(as.numeric(c)))"
# new call
DT[, mylist, by=type]

With the following error:

1: hello
2:   bye
3:    ok
mylist
1: list(lengtha = length(as.numeric(a)), maxb = max(as.numeric(b)), meanc = mean(as.numeric(c)))
2: list(lengtha = length(as.numeric(a)), maxb = max(as.numeric(b)), meanc = mean(as.numeric(c)))
3: list(lengtha = length(as.numeric(a)), maxb = max(as.numeric(b)), meanc = mean(as.numeric(c)))

Any hints appreciated! Best regards!

PS sorry about these as.numeric(), I could not quite figure out why, but I needed them for the example to run.

Minor edit inserted columns / before data.frame in initial sentence to clarify my needs.

share|improve this question
2  
if you provide vector inputs to cbind, the result would be a matrix. And since matrix can not hold both character and numeric arguments, every vector other than type will be converted to character. Instead you should do: data.frame(type,a,b,c, stringsAsFactors=F). Even better, you can directly use data.table(type, a, b, c), –  Arun Feb 6 '13 at 8:30
1  
you mean to say your aggregation needs vary amongst the columns of data.table/data.frame? What you say and what you show aren't quite the same. Because later you talk about "future data.frames will have more columns". –  Arun Feb 6 '13 at 8:37
1  
@Arun The answer is yes. It is more useful/accurate to characterize them as varying amongst the columns. Will make a small edit about that. Thanks for pointing out the needless/counterproductive use of cbind as well ! –  jjap Feb 6 '13 at 14:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Another way is to use .SDcols to group the columns for which you'd like to perform the same operations together. Let's say that you require columns a,d,e to be summed by type where as, b,g should have mean taken and c,f its median, then,

# constructing an example data.table:
set.seed(45)
dt <- data.table(type=rep(c("hello","bye","ok"), each=3), a=sample(9), 
                 b = rnorm(9), c=runif(9), d=sample(9), e=sample(9), 
                 f = runif(9), g=rnorm(9))

#     type a          b         c d e         f          g
# 1: hello 6 -2.5566166 0.7485015 9 6 0.5661358 -2.2066521
# 2: hello 3  1.1773119 0.6559926 3 3 0.4586280 -0.8376586
# 3: hello 2 -0.1015588 0.2164430 1 7 0.9299597  1.7216593
# 4:   bye 8 -0.2260640 0.3924327 8 2 0.1271187  0.4360063
# 5:   bye 7 -1.0720503 0.3256450 7 8 0.5774691  0.7571990
# 6:   bye 5 -0.7131021 0.4855804 6 9 0.2687791  1.5398858
# 7:    ok 1 -0.4680549 0.8476840 2 4 0.5633317  1.5393945
# 8:    ok 4  0.4183264 0.4402595 4 1 0.7592801  2.1829996
# 9:    ok 9 -1.4817436 0.5080116 5 5 0.2357030 -0.9953758

# 1) set key
setkey(dt, "type")

# 2) group col-ids by similar operations
id1 <- which(names(dt) %in% c("a", "d", "e"))
id2 <- which(names(dt) %in% c("b","g"))
id3 <- which(names(dt) %in% c("c","f"))

# 3) now use these ids in with .SDcols parameter
dt1 <- dt[, lapply(.SD, sum), by="type", .SDcols=id1]
dt2 <- dt[, lapply(.SD, mean), by="type", .SDcols=id2]
dt3 <- dt[, lapply(.SD, median), by="type", .SDcols=id3]

# 4) merge them.
dt1[dt2[dt3]]

#     type  a  d  e          b          g         c         f
# 1:   bye 20 21 19 -0.6704055  0.9110304 0.3924327 0.2687791
# 2: hello 11 13 16 -0.4936211 -0.4408838 0.6559926 0.5661358
# 3:    ok 14 11 10 -0.5104907  0.9090061 0.5080116 0.5633317

If/when you have many many column, making a list like the one you've might be cumbersome.

share|improve this answer
2  
This approach will actually mesh perfectly with my workflow. Thanks for reading around my words and through my mind. –  jjap Feb 6 '13 at 14:39
1  
For those reading this far, who may not be familiar with the .SD symbol (or data.table for that matter): datatable-faq 2.1 has a very good explanation. .SDcols is documented in the data.table help file. –  jjap Feb 6 '13 at 15:50

This is explained FAQ 1.6 what you are looking for is quote and eval

something like

 mycall <- quote(list(lengtha = length(as.numeric(a)), maxb = max(as.numeric(b)), meanc = mean(as.numeric(c))))

 DT[, eval(mycall)]

After a bit of head-banging, here is a very ugly way of constructing the call for ddply using .()

myplyrcall <- .(lengtha = length(as.numeric(a)), maxb = max(as.numeric(b)), meanc = mean(as.numeric(c)))

do.call(ddply,c(.data = quote(DF), .variables = 'type',.fun = quote(summarise),myplyrcall))

You could also use as.quoted which has an as.quoted.character method to construct using paste0

myplc <-as.quoted(c("lengtha" = "length(as.numeric(a))", "maxb" = "max(as.numeric(b))", "meanc" = "mean(as.numeric(c))"))

This can be used with data.table as well!

dtcall <- as.quoted(mylist)[[1]]


DT[,eval(dtcall), by = type]

data.table all the way.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Yes this is the idiomatic way. The eval here is treated specially by data.table and j is optimized even though it's dynamic. –  Matt Dowle Feb 6 '13 at 10:15
    
OMG! You are right... right there in the FAQ! Thanks for the solutions. Nice to see one that work under both plyr and data.table. –  jjap Feb 6 '13 at 14:50

Another method (supporting the use of paste or paste0 to build the expression):

expr <- parse(text=mylist)
DT[, eval( expr ), by=type]
#-------
    type lengtha      maxb     meanc
1: hello       3 0.8265407 0.5244094
2:   bye       3 0.4955301 0.6289475
3:    ok       3 0.9527455 0.5600915
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 Small comment that parse will be evaluated here on each iteration (the same parse each time, wastefully). So it's faster to take that outside the loop and use the pre parsed expression in j. Either q=parse(text=...) or q=quote(...) before the DT query are ok. That then allows data.table to optimize the j query. It only optimizes (changes the j expression) once before grouping; it can't optimize if the parse is inside j. –  Matt Dowle Feb 6 '13 at 10:09
1  
Edited to incorporate this improvement. –  BondedDust Feb 6 '13 at 17:41

I find it worrysome that apparently eval is part of the answer. From your question it is not clear to me, if and why you really want to do what you claim to want. Thus I demonstrate here that you can also use a function:

fun <- function(a,b,c) {
  list(lengtha = length(as.numeric(a)), 
          maxb = max(as.numeric(b)), 
         meanc = mean(as.numeric(c)))  
}

DT[, fun(a,b,c), by=type]

    type lengtha      maxb     meanc
1: hello       3 0.8792184 0.3745643
2:   bye       3 0.8718397 0.4519999
3:    ok       3 0.8900764 0.4511536
share|improve this answer
    
Roland, the OP has more columns than shown here. I find it impractical to write a function (or eval for that matter) instead of exploiting .SDcols (unless I'm missing something obvious). –  Arun Feb 6 '13 at 8:32
1  
@Arun Your second statement is true, but I don't know if it makes sense to keep playing Guess-What-OP-Needs ... –  Roland Feb 6 '13 at 8:35
    
Yes, it's not quite apparent, I agree. –  Arun Feb 6 '13 at 8:39
3  
+1 But the function call will create its own environment for each call, iiuc. The eval approach may be preferred for speed because data.table evals the expression directly in a static environment which data.table creates internally. The eval call itself isn't eval'd. That is stripped off leaving the expression itself, which is then optimized before being eval'd by a C level eval by the grouping code. How much difference it makes of course depends. The function call is a nice syntax and that can often trump speed. –  Matt Dowle Feb 6 '13 at 10:23
    
@MatthewDowle Thank you for the clarification. I'm always learning something new about data.table. –  Roland Feb 6 '13 at 10:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.