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im trying to figure out how to write a sql query for this:

I have a database which contains a column X. X has datetime values if set by a function otherwise it has a default value which looks something like this 0001-01-01.00.00.00.000000

What I am interested in doing is writing sql that will retrieve all the rows of X sorted by latest datetime values.

I thought this would be the answer

 Select * from Some_Table st where st.Dbname = "blah" order_by st.x desc

but then I was thinking what happens to the default values? how do they affect the sorting

Any ideas if this is the way to go?

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What RDBMS is this?? Also are you sure about this string literal value being this way: "blah" or it is an identifier? – Mahmoud Gamal Feb 6 '13 at 4:41
    
The default values would go last, if placed in a descending order. What is the expected result? – Orangecrush Feb 6 '13 at 4:43
    
Your default date values are valid data entries, yet not much use. Why include them in the result set. Moreover, if it is a default value for any reason why not set it to null? – lrb Feb 6 '13 at 4:44
    
Exclude the default datetime, as it is a magic value anyways. Select * from Some_Table st where st.Dbname = "blah" AND st.X NOT LIKE '0001-01-01.00.00.00.000000' order_by st.x desc You could also use a case statement, possibly in combination with a coalesce. – SpykeBytes Feb 6 '13 at 4:47
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ordering by date desc will work fine. Why not make the column nullable so you don't need a default? Also it sounds like you only want the latest single record so you may want to consider using SELECT TOP 1 * FROM blah ORDER BY date DESC

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