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How I can execute a JavaScript function/piece of code in a specific context which it would see as a global context? This is not the same as changing this (call/apply), this is more like changing 'window'.

Basically, if I have the following code:

(function() { x.value = 5; return value; })()

is there a way to make it work (return 5) without changing the code itself?

Also, executing code in the context of x (if possible) is my first idea, but maybe there is some other solution as well?

UPDATE:

Original problem: I am trying to test a bookmarklet using selenium. Bookmarklet assumes that it can do

window.SomeObject = {...}; SomeObject.doSomething();

I get the bookmarklet from the page and execute it using $selenium.get_eval, and in context of get_eval global object is some object of selenium itself, not the window. window.SomeObject still works because selenium context has window, but just SomeObject does not work.

I think I know another possible solution, but I would like to know if there is an answer to original question.

UPDATE 2 (solution):

Final solution (based on answer by geowa4):

x = {}; with(x) { return (function() { x.value = 5; return value; })(); }
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could you please explain what are you trying to do exactly? –  dusoft Sep 24 '09 at 14:51
    
First of all, you're setting x.value but returning just value, so your code won't "return 5". Second of all, what? –  Crescent Fresh Sep 24 '09 at 14:53
    
added explanation to the end of the post –  Andrey Shchekin Sep 24 '09 at 19:45
    
@crescentfresh it will if x === window, for example (in normal browser context) –  Andrey Shchekin Sep 24 '09 at 19:47
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can change your scope using the with keyword.

(function() { x.value = 5; with(x) { return value; })();

The with keyword scopes the block of code to the given object. So in this case, you will return 5.

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> Without changing the code itself? –  Crescent Fresh Sep 24 '09 at 16:01
1  
@crescentfresh: yeah, but that's impossible so i went with the closest option. a bit of a stab in the dark. –  geowa4 Sep 24 '09 at 17:28
    
I have added more details to the question. With is a very good idea, but will it work in outer scope? I'll check. –  Andrey Shchekin Sep 24 '09 at 19:48
    
You rule. x = {}; with(x) { var result = (function() { x.value = 5; return value; })(); alert(result); } works perfectly! –  Andrey Shchekin Sep 24 '09 at 19:55
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