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I have this codes:

class ClockLabel extends JLabel implements ActionListener {

    public ClockLabel() {
        super("" + new java.util.Date());
       Timer t = new Timer(1000, this);
       t.start();
    }

   @Override
   public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae) {
      txtclock.setText((new java.util.Date()).toString());
   }
 }

and my output is

Wed Feb 06 14:22:44 CST 2013

how can I change my output in this format

"MM dd yyyy HH:mm:ss"
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what have you tried? –  Nikolay Kuznetsov Feb 6 '13 at 6:26
    
i tried to input it super("" + new java.util.Date("MM dd yyyy HH:mm:ss")); –  kelvzy Feb 6 '13 at 6:31
    
Googling java format date gives SimpleDateFormat as a first link. –  Nikolay Kuznetsov Feb 6 '13 at 6:34

6 Answers 6

You can use SimpleDateFormat to format the date

SimpleDateFormat f = new SimpleDateFormat("MM dd yyyy HH:mm:ss");
txtclock.setText(f.format(new java.util.Date()));
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thank you it works.. –  kelvzy Feb 6 '13 at 6:34

Look at SimpleDateFormat class. You can construct the instance of SimpleDateformat with patteryn"MM dd yyyy HH:mm:ss"and pass the date object informat()`.

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SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("MM dd yyyy HH:mm:ss");
String sDate= sdf.format(new java.util.Date());
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Please go through this link:

http://www.tutorialspoint.com/java/java_date_time.htm

here you can find different time formats.

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Use simple date format

@Override
   public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae) {
      SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat("MM dd yyyy HH:mm:ss");
      txtclock.setText(format.format(new java.util.Date()));
   }
share|improve this answer

Modify your code as

class ClockLabel extends JLabel implements ActionListener {
    java.util.Date date;
    public ClockLabel() {
        super(getStrVAl());
        Timer t = new Timer(1000, this);
        t.start();
    }

    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae) {
        txtclock.setText(getStrVAl());
    }

    public String getStrVAl() {
        date=new java.util.Date();
        String val=date.getMonth().toString()+" "+date.getDate().toString()+" "+date.getYear().toString()+" "date.getHours().toString()+":"+date.getMinutes().toString()+":"+date.getSeconds()().toString()+" ");
        return val;
    }
}
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