Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This may be a very basic question for some. I was trying to understand how strcpy works actually behind the scenes. for example, in this code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
int main ()
{
  char s[6] = "Hello";
  char a[20] = "world isnsadsdas";
  strcpy(s,a);

  printf("%s\n",s);
  printf("%d\n", sizeof(s));
  return 0;
}

As I am declaring s to be a static array with size less than that of source. I thought it wont print the whole word, but it did print world isnsadsdas .. So, I thought that this strcpy function might be allocating new size if destination is less than the source. But now, when I check sizeof(s), it is still 6, but it is printing out more than that. Hows that working actually?

share|improve this question
    
Maybe it use memcpy? –  Alvin Wong Feb 6 '13 at 7:04
    
Wait... what I get is "world isnsadsdas". There is no "Hello". –  Alvin Wong Feb 6 '13 at 7:06
    
actually it is that only.. by mistake I added hello.. still exceeding the size –  UnderDog Feb 6 '13 at 7:08
    
student.cs.uwaterloo.ca/~cs350/common/os161-src-html/… Notice there is no memory allocation. Also, you might find that if you print 'a' after the strcpy, it is messed up, but also no promises because the compiler could allocate more space that you requested. –  nous Feb 6 '13 at 7:08
2  
Strcpy copies FROM a TO s in your example. Hence you have a stack overflow since you're putting the whole string "world isnsadadas" into a buffer of length 6 bytes. –  SecurityMatt Feb 6 '13 at 7:12

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You've just caused undefined behaviour, so anything can happen. In your case, you're getting lucky and it's not crashing, but you shouldn't rely on that happening. Here's a simplified strcpy implementation (but it's not too far off from many real ones):

char *strcpy(char *d, const char *s)
{
   char *saved = d;
   while (*s)
   {
       *d++ = *s++;
   }
   *d = 0;
   return saved;
}

sizeof is just returning you the size of your array from compile time. If you use strlen, I think you'll see what you expect. But as I mentioned above, relying on undefined behaviour is a bad idea.

share|improve this answer
    
So thats undefined behavior! GREAT! I was scared as how come the rules decided to stop working all of sudden.. –  UnderDog Feb 6 '13 at 7:06
    
but this implementation would still produce undefined behavior for my example, right? –  UnderDog Feb 6 '13 at 7:17
1  
@UnderDog, yes absolutely. I don't see how any implementation wouldn't, as long as it obeyed traditional strcpy semantics. –  Carl Norum Feb 6 '13 at 7:18
    
That's not strcpy anymore. It's more like strncpy, but with built-in strlen(dest) rather than the n parameter. Edit: Wait, where did it go? –  Carl Norum Feb 6 '13 at 7:25
    
ahh.. okay.. will check strncpy –  UnderDog Feb 6 '13 at 7:26

In C there is no bounds checking of arrays, its a trade off in order to have better performance at the risk of shooting yourself in the foot.

strcpy() doesn't care whether the target buffer is big enough so copying too many bytes will cause undefined behavior.

that is one of the reasons that a new version of strcpy were introduced where you can specify the target buffer size strcpy_s()

share|improve this answer
    
Or strncpy, if you're speaking about GLibC. –  C-16 Feb 6 '13 at 7:14

Note that sizeof(s) is determined at run time. Use strlen() to find the number of characters s occupied. When you perform strcpy() source string will be replaced by destination string so your output wont be "Helloworld isnsadsdas"

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
main ()
{
  char s[6] = "Hello";
  char a[20] = "world isnsadsdas";
  strcpy(s,a);

  printf("%s\n",s);
  printf("%d\n", strlen(s));
}
share|improve this answer

You are relying on undefined behaviour in as much as that the compiler has chose to place the two arrays where your code happens to work. This may not work in future.

As to the sizeof operator, this is figured out at compile time.

Once you use adequate array sizes you need to use strlen to fetch the length of the strings.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually the placement of the arrays within the stack frame is fixed for all time by the compiler on any given compilation run. What MIGHT change in future is if you dare to recompile the app and the stack overflow is put next to the return address, at which point all hell breaks loose. –  SecurityMatt Feb 6 '13 at 7:16
    
@SecurityMatt - That is what I meant bu in the future. –  Ed Heal Feb 6 '13 at 9:50

http://natashenka.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/strcpy8x11.png

strcpy is considered dangerous for reasons like the one you are demonstrating. The two buffers you created are local variables stored in the stack frame of the function. Here is roughly what the stack frame looks like: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d3/Call_stack_layout.svg/342px-Call_stack_layout.svg.png

FYI things are put on top of the stack meaning it grows backwards through memory (This does not mean the variables in memory are read backwards, just that newer ones are put 'behind' older ones). So that means if you write far enough into the locals section of your function's stack frame, you will write forward over every other stack variable after the variable you are copying to and break into other sections, and eventually overwrite the return pointer. The result is that if you are clever, you have full control of where the function returns. You could make it do anything really, but it isn't YOU that is the concern.

As you seem to know by making your first buffer 6 chars long for a 5 character string, C strings end in a null byte \x00. The strcpy function copies bytes until the source byte is 0, but it does not check that the destination is that long, which is why it can copy over the boundary of the array. This is also why your print is reading the buffer past its size, it reads till \x00. Interestingly, the strcpy may have written into the data of s depending on the order the compiler gave it in the stack, so a fun exercise could be to also print a and see if you get something like 'snsadsdas', but I can't be sure what it would look like even if it is polluting s because there are sometimes bytes in between the stack entries for various reasons).

If this buffer holds say, a password to check in code with a hashing function, and you copy it to a buffer in the stack from wherever you get it (a network packet if a server, or a text box, etc) you very well may copy more data from the source than the destination buffer can hold and give return control of your program to whatever user was able to send a packet to you or try a password. They just have to type the right number of characters, and then the correct characters that represent an address to somewhere in ram to jump to.

You can use strcpy if you check the bounds and maybe trim the source string, but it is considered bad practice. There are more modern functions that take a max length like http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstring/strncpy/

Oh and lastly, this is all called a buffer overflow. Some compilers add a nice little blob of bytes randomly chosen by the OS before and after every stack entry. After every copy the OS checks these bytes against its copy and terminates the program if they differ. This solves a lot of security problems, but it is still possible to copy bytes far enough into the stack to overwrite the pointer to the function to handle what happens when those bytes have been changed thus letting you do the same thing. It just becomes a lot harder to do right.

share|improve this answer

The best way to understand how strcpy works behind the scene is...reading its source code! You can read the source for GLibC : http://fossies.org/dox/glibc-2.17/strcpy_8c_source.html . I hope it helps!

share|improve this answer

Better Solution is

char *strcpy(char *p,char const *q)
{
   char *saved=p;

   while(*p++=*q++);//enter code here

   return saved;
}
share|improve this answer
    
use {} to put your code –  Jageen Sep 9 at 11:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.