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It may sound silly, but it makes sense when you have object of (key, value) pair and you sort them according to the keys. To illustrate my point with code:

public class Pair implements Comparable<Pair> {
    private int value;
    private int key;

    public Pair(int key, int value) {
        this.key   = key;
        this.value = value;
    }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(Pair o) {
        if (this.key > o.key)
            return 1;
        else if (this.key < o.key)
            return -1;
        return 0;
    }
}

public class program {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        PriorityQueue<Pair> queue = new PriorityQueue<Pair>;
        queue.add(new Pair(1,1));
        queue.add(new Pair(1,2));
        queue.add(new Pair(1,3));

        Pair pair = queue.poll(); // What would be in pair?
    }
}

What would be in pair? The first or the last added element? Or any of them without possibility to decide?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

PriorityQueue API makes no promises for this situation:

The head of this queue is the least element with respect to the specified ordering. If multiple elements are tied for least value, the head is one of those elements -- ties are broken arbitrarily. The queue retrieval operations poll, remove, peek, and element access the element at the head of the queue.

But it's easy to test. Add toString to Pair

@Override
public String toString() {
    return key + " " + value;
}

and print the poll result

    Pair pair = queue.poll(); // What would be in pair?
    System.out.println(pair);

it prints

1 1
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1  
+1 for the only correct answer. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 6 '13 at 7:23
1  
So if I understand it correctly - I simply cannot rely on what will be the value I get first? Because from the output it really looks like it is "FIFO" behaviour. –  Petr Feb 6 '13 at 7:41
1  
According to API you can't, but my tests also show FIFO-like behaviour for same Pair.key. –  Evgeniy Dorofeev Feb 6 '13 at 7:47

Priority queue is heap-based and as for the ties, javadoc clearly states that:

If multiple elements are tied for least value, the head is one of those elements -- ties are broken arbitrarily.

In this particular case it will be the element that was added first since it will be the head of the queue.

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1  
"Ties are broken arbitrarily" means the opposite of "the element that was added first." It could mean "the element that was added first except on Tuesdays." Arbitrarily means not specified. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 6 '13 at 7:23
1  
@LouisWasserman I know what arbitrarily means. I also assume you should know what is a heap datastructure (if not, recommend you to read about it). In this particular case first element added will be head of the heap and it will be the one that poll() returns. –  Andrew Logvinov Feb 6 '13 at 7:31
    
+1 for the explanation –  TheWhiteRabbit Feb 6 '13 at 7:46
1  
@AndrewLogvinov That is simply untrue. Any re-heaping operation can change the ordering arbitrarily. –  EJP Feb 6 '13 at 10:21
    
@EJP I'm not arguing that this can happen. I'm just saying that it won't happen in this particular case. –  Andrew Logvinov Feb 6 '13 at 10:39

Basically a Queue is firstInfirstOut data structure.

In PriorityQueue the comparable-ity defines the order.

As with your case priority of all the Pair() are same . hence no change in order.

First-In-First-Out i.e Pairs (1,1) (1,2) (1,3)

As per documentation

The queue retrieval operations poll, remove, peek, and element access the element at the head of the queue.

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it'd be better a comment is followed by downvote, i see no wrong –  TheWhiteRabbit Feb 6 '13 at 7:26
    
Answer is not correct. The order is indeterminate. –  EJP Feb 6 '13 at 10:20

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