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Well the title says it all.

For example, I have an Employee class

class Employee
{
   private Date joinDate;

   public Date getJoinDate()
   {
       return joinDate;    
   }
}

Here getJoinDate returns reference to the internal joinDate object. When I analysed my code in FindBug it gave me a "Malicious code vulnerability" warning as "... may expose internal representation by returning ClassXYZ.pqrDate"

So there is possibility that any code accessing this getter can modify date stored in this instance of the class outside the instance. So should I use copy constructors

Q1. should I write copy constructors or not (or follow any other approach):

class Employee
{
   private Date joinDate;

   Employee(Employee e)      //copy constructor
   {
       joinDate = e.joinDate;
   }

   public Date getJoinDate()
   {
       return joinDate;    
   }
}

Q2 How can I write copy constructors for framework objects? I can define copy constructors for my business objects but not for framework objects. Should I have a generic util class with all methods returning new instance of framework class accepting the instance?

class CopyConstructorUtil
{
    public Date copyDate(Date date)
    {
         return new Date(date.getTime());
    }
    //....
}

Also Java Object class do provide clone() method which is inheritted by all classes. But it returns Object. So should I simply do casting inside getters? :

class Employee
{
   private Date joinDate;

   public Date getJoinDate()
   {
       return (Date)joinDate.clone();    
   }
}

Q3. Which approach is preferable? or should I use any other approach?

share|improve this question
    
If someone wants to attack your code, using clone() is not safe too, because one can use a child class of Date whose clone() method is not the default implementation. – Amir Pashazadeh Feb 6 '13 at 7:31
    
Use clone. That's exactly why it exists. – Eric Feb 6 '13 at 7:43
    
@Amir: not sure I follow - how does the derived class get into the system? – Eric Feb 6 '13 at 7:45
    
@Eric I edited my answer, and mentioned how can clone() be source of problems. – Amir Pashazadeh Feb 6 '13 at 22:09
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is mutability of Java's Data type. So even using copy constructor, without instantiation of a new Date still leaks your object state.

You shall do as (you need to modify getter and setter both), other wise you are leaking your object state:

public Date getJoinDate() {
    return new Date(joinDate.getTime());
}

public void setDate(Date joinDate) {
    this.joinDate = new Date(joinDate.getTime());
}

Calling clone() is not so good, because as in Effective Java, 2nd Edition mentioned, it can be a security issue as:

class MyDate extends Date {
    public Object clone() {
        return this;
    }
}

now you can pass this object as a date, and because the caller can hold the reference to the object, it can manipulate object's state, even after cloning.

share|improve this answer
    
There's still no reason not to use clone in getJoinDate – Eric Feb 6 '13 at 22:15
    
Well, in the case, one can inject a mutated date to bean, and change its state, without the bean being notified. – Amir Pashazadeh Feb 7 '13 at 10:24

I would suggest you declare Date Object as final and use copy constructor.

There are nice article "on why clone() has many disadvantages in Java" link.

class Employee{
    private final Date joinDate;
    public Employee(Date joinDate,...){
         this.joinDate = joinDate;
    }
    public Date getJoinDate(){
         return new Date(joinDate);    
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
sadly, java.util.date is mutable and putting final will not prohibited a change to this object – omartin Feb 6 '13 at 7:19

A copy constructor for your Employees class will not prevent anyone from changing the date you return with

Date.setTime(long)

I would clone the internal objects before returning them. Or rather than cloning I would use the method you use before the clone code. Like this:

class Employee {
   private final Date joinDate;

   public Date getJoinDate() {
       return new Date(joinDate.getTime());
   }
}

This solution requires no casting and will prevent anyone from editing your internal members.

share|improve this answer
1  
be carful, joinDate can be null and your code will throw a NPE. – omartin Feb 6 '13 at 7:24
    
That is true. And the exact same problem exist for clone() as well. – faern Feb 6 '13 at 8:33
    
Nope you did not get the intention I put that code. See its not about Date but returning and accepting Employee. Like Employee e2 = new Employee(e1); In this case calling e1.setJoinDate() will not update e2.joinDate – Mahesha999 Feb 6 '13 at 9:30
    
ohkay for Date there is getTime() method, but for other Framework classes there are not such methods that can allow us to very easily create clonned instance, so what to do in these situations? – Mahesha999 Feb 6 '13 at 13:21

In our project, we have disable this findbugs rules. Findbigs is true, date are mutable objects so if you really want to prevent any change you have no choice except:

  • return the date as a long to prevent exposing the instance

  • do a copy each time the getter is set

But you should also considered the code of doing a copy each time. This is for this reason that we have disabled this rule on our side and accept this vulnerability.

share|improve this answer

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