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I need to move a value attribute at the beginning of a html string containing tags with some other attributes.

It can pass to me something like this

<option (attrs1)* value="1" (attrs2)*>...</option>
<option (attrs1)* value='1' (attrs2)*>...</option>
<option (attrs1)* value=1 (attrs2)*>...</option>

And it should be

<option value="1" (attrs1)* (attrs2)*>...</option>
<option value='1' (attrs1)* (attrs2)*>...</option>
<option value=1 (attrs1)* (attrs2)*>...</option>

How can it be done via Regex in .Net?

  • It's a training exercise
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6  
Why do you need that? –  VisioN Feb 6 '13 at 7:36
    
What exactly do you mean by normalize? Do you want the attribute value to appears always at the begining? –  Oscar Mederos Feb 6 '13 at 7:42
    
@Oscar Mederos yes, it's exactly what I need –  fX' Feb 6 '13 at 7:46
    
-1 the order of the attribute doesn't matter..even if you do what you want,that won't do anything different –  Anirudha Feb 6 '13 at 7:47
    
@Some1.Kill.The.DJ What if it is just a programming/regex excersise or something? –  Oscar Mederos Feb 6 '13 at 7:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Disclaimer: it's a Javascript based solution, but I imagine, that .Net provides the same support for regular expressions as other languages like Python and Ruby, hence the approach should be valid (minus language specific syntax). It's here to show that it can be done using just a single regexp.

The idea behind the regex is to find start of the tag, the "value=..." part and then everything in between. Then using replace function you reorganize found parts so the "value" tag is always just after start tag.

Ok, here goes (Javascript version):

// some example string
var x = "<something bla=5432 other-st='asdf' value=\"45\"/><p name=asdf value=55fs andalso=\"something\">html like</p>";
x.replace(/(\<(?!\/)[a-z]+)(.+?)?(\ value=(?:\"|\')?[^\"\'\ ]+(?:\"|\')?)/gi, function(a, b, c, d) {return b+d+c;})

Update: Here's C# version (by fX'):

string x = "<something bla=5432 other-st='asdf' value=\"45\"/><p name=asdf value=55fs andalso=\"something\">html like</p>";
var r = new Regex("(<(?!/)[a-z]+)(.+?)?(\\sVALUE=(?:\"|')?[^\"'\\s]+(?:\"|')?)", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
string s = r.Replace(x, (match) => { return match.Groups[1].Value + match.Groups[3].Value + match.Groups[2].Value; });
share|improve this answer
    
Great! Here is a port on c#: string x = "<something bla=5432 other-st='asdf' value=\"45\"/><p name=asdf value=55fs andalso=\"something\">html like</p>"; var r = new Regex("(<(?!/)[a-z]+)(.+?)?(\\sVALUE=(?:\"|')?[^\"'\\s]+(?:\"|')?)", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase); string s = r.Replace(x, (match) => { return match.Groups[1].Value + match.Groups[3].Value + match.Groups[2].Value; }); –  fX' Feb 6 '13 at 9:10

Here is an example of how you can do that using HtmlAgilityPack. If you still want to do it using regex, see the other part of the answer.

string html = @"<option foo1='bar1' value=""1"" foo=bar></option>";
var doc = new HtmlAgilityPack.HtmlDocument();
doc.LoadHtml(html);

var node = doc.DocumentNode.ChildNodes[0];
//Get all the attributes
var attributes = new List<HtmlAttribute>(node.Attributes);
//Remove all the attributes
node.Attributes.RemoveAll();

//Insert them again
foreach (var attr in attributes) {
    //If we found the 'value' atrribute, insert it at the begining
    if (attr.Name == "value")
    {
        node.Attributes.Insert(0, attr);
    }
    else {
        node.Attributes.Add(attr);
    }
}

Console.WriteLine(doc.DocumentNode.OuterHtml);

The above code will print:

<option value="1" foo="bar" foo1='bar1'>

That was just an example. You can do that for all the nodes on your HTML, or just apply that on the ones you need, etc.


Another example using Regex. You might have to modify to match 100% your needs.

string regex = @"<([\w]+)\s+(?:(\w+)=[""']?([^\s""']+)[""']?\s*)+>";
string html = @"<option foo=bar value=""1"" foo2='bar2'>...</option>
                <option foo=bar value=""1"" foo2='bar2'>...</option>
                <option foo=bar value=""1"" foo2='bar2'>...</option>";

//Getting all the matches.
var matches = Regex.Matches(html, regex);
foreach (Match m in matches) {
    //This will contain the replaced string
    string result = string.Format("<{0}", m.Groups[1].Value);

    //Here we will store all the keys
    var keys = new List<string>();
    //Here we will store all the values
    var values = new List<string>();

    //For every pair (key, value) matched
    for (int i = 0; i < m.Groups[2].Captures.Count; i++) {
        //Get the key
        var key = m.Groups[2].Captures[i].Value;
        //Get the value
        var value = m.Groups[3].Captures[i].Value;

        //Insert on the list (if key is 'value', insert at the beginning)
        if (key == "value") {
            keys.Insert(0, key);
            values.Insert(0, value);
        }
        else {
            keys.Add(key);
            values.Add(value);
        }
    }

    //Concatenate all the (key, value) attributes to the replaced string
    for (int i = 0; i < keys.Count; i++) {
        result += string.Format(@" {0}=""{1}""", keys[i], values[i]);
    }

    //Close the tag
    result += ">";

    Console.WriteLine(result);
}

That will print:

<option value="1" foo="bar" foo2="bar2">
<option value="1" foo="bar" foo2="bar2">
<option value="1" foo="bar" foo2="bar2">
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think you need the ToList(), as it'll be an IEnumerable anyway? –  FallingBullets Feb 6 '13 at 8:02
    
@FallingBullets Correct. I just wrote .ToList() to be able to see the attributes while debugging (when writing the answer) :) –  Oscar Mederos Feb 6 '13 at 8:04
    
@FallingBullets In fact, I don't even need to sort the attributes. That was just a test too :/ –  Oscar Mederos Feb 6 '13 at 8:05
    
@Oscar Mederos Thanks for your post. By the problem is that is should be done via Regex only –  fX' Feb 6 '13 at 8:05
1  
@fX' There you have another solution using regex. That regular expression could be modified, and perhaps optimized. That is just an example, so that you can start working on top of it... –  Oscar Mederos Feb 6 '13 at 8:24

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