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I'm using quite a bit of Javascript code for a compiler design project and need some assistance. I currently am getting an error trying to do some manipulation in the following code: assume -

var first = {}            //contains key:values

var N =
 'S
  printS 
  expr 
  expr\' '

var R = "assignS ; S | printS ; S | epsilon", 
" print expr", 
" term expr'", 
" + term expr' | epsilon"
for(var i=0;i<N.length;i++){  //use N[i]
    for(var j=0;j<R[i+1].length;j++) {  
        var tmpR = R[i+1];
        var X = tmpR.split(' | ');  //use X
        output.value += X[j] + '\n';
        for(var n=0;n<X.length;n++) { //X=terminal or non term, individual words
            first[N[i]] += first[X[n]];
/*line 74*/ if( first[X[n]].indexOf("epsilon") < 0 ) {
                break;  //nothing contributes
            }
         }
     }
     if( N[i].indexOf("epsilon") != -1 ) {      
         first[N[i]] += 'epsilon'
     }
}

Firebug reports:
'TypeError: first[X[n]] is undefined file:///C:/Users/Dohrann/Compiler/Lab3/first.js Line 74'

I am stumped. first is a map object I am using with key:value pairs. I am guessing it is returning false because the string contained at X[n] position is not a key within my map. Would this be a primary reason for this error? Or is this error maybe caused by indexOf not finding an 'epsilon'? I was under the impression indexOf returns a -1 for nothing found so I have ruled this out.

Help would be much appreciated.

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Try add break point at that line or use console.log to see what're first, N, N[i] and first[N[i]]. Check if any is undefined. –  Ovilia Feb 6 '13 at 8:07

2 Answers 2

firebug reports: 'TypeError: first[X[n]] is undefined file:///C:/Users/Dohrann/Compiler/Lab3/first.js Line 74

That's telling you that either X doesn't have an element at n or that first doesn't have an element at X[n], but you're trying to use the value at that position. When you reference a property of an object (elements are arrays are properties of an object), if that property (element) doesn't exist, you get the value undefined.

We can't help you figure out why without knowing more about the code, in particular what first, N, and R are.


Re your edit posting first, N, and R:

The first thing you have to do is fix the syntax errors, and probably gen up on basic JavaScript synxtax. Your JavaScript environment (browser, whatever) should be telling you about at least a couple of errors, look in the console and such. Here're some pointers:

// Not an error, but poor practice: Terminate statements with semicolons (after the `}`)
var first = {}            //contains key:values

// This has an error, strings cannot span lines without a backslash before
// the line terminator (and it's poor practice in any case)
var N =
 'S
  printS 
  expr 
  expr\' '

// The statement below is equivalent to: var R = " + term expr' | epsilon";
// because you're using the comma operator, and the result of the comma
// operator is the last expression delimited by commas. If you mean for
// `R` to be an array, you need `[` at the beginning and `]` at the end.
var R = "assignS ; S | printS ; S | epsilon", 
" print expr", 
" term expr'", 
" + term expr' | epsilon"

Re your comment below

This is not straight from the code, I typed this to be readable as an example. The code puts these values in itself. Thought it to be much easier to just show a hard coded example. Basic syntax is taken care of.

Well that's frankly not useful. You have a code problem, posting nonsense code doesn't help people help you.

Trying to read past that:

You're starting with an empty first object, and on the first innermost loop (the n loop), you're accessing first[X[n]]. n is 0, which means X[n] is "assignS ; S ", but you've never assigned anything to first["assignS ; S "], so line 74 fails, because first["assignS ; S "] is undefined but you're trying to dereference it and treat it like a string.

So that's the most obvious initial problem, but there could well be others. There's nothing for it but to step through the code with a debugger (all major browsers have one built in; I think you're already using FireBug) and deal with the issues you see.

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line 74 is defined within the comments of the code. I will edit for N, R, first declarations. –  Dohrann Feb 6 '13 at 8:35
    
@Dohrann: Ah, so it is. –  T.J. Crowder Feb 6 '13 at 8:44
    
@Dohrann: Updated the answer to address some issues with the code. Recommend taking a step back and genning up on fundamental JavaScript syntax before trying to jump into something this complicated. –  T.J. Crowder Feb 6 '13 at 9:15
    
This is not straight from the code, I typed this to be readable as an example. The code puts these values in itself. Thought it to be much easier to just show a hard coded example. Basic syntax is taken care of. –  Dohrann Feb 6 '13 at 9:28
    
@Dohrann: It is not useful to post nonsense code in a question. Surely that was obvious. If you want to post pseudocode, label it as such, but really it's much better to create a small, self-contained, correct example and post that. –  T.J. Crowder Feb 6 '13 at 9:38

error will be first[X[n]] is undefined. first may not have an element at the index X[n]. That will be the error. you can bypass the error by using the following code

if (first[X[n]])
{
  if (first[X[n]].indexof("epsilon") < 0 ) {
                    break;                  //nothing contributes
      }
}

indexof("epsilon") will return -1 if first[X[n]] exists and epsilon is not present. Here there is no first[X[n]] itself. So dont expect -1 here

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