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I have a LocalDate and a LocalTime and would like to simply create a LocalDateTime struct from them. I thought of the following extension method which I believe would be the fastest but for an obscure reason the field localTime.TickOfMillisecond does not exist in the current version of the API. So it does not work.

    public static LocalDateTime At(this LocalDate localDate, LocalTime localTime) {
        return new LocalDateTime(localDate.Year, localDate.Month, localDate.Day, localTime.Hour, localTime.Minute, localTime.Second, localTime.Millisecond, localTime.TickOfMillisecond);
    }

So, am I stuck in the mean time to use:

    public static LocalDateTime At(this LocalDate localDate, LocalTime localTime) {
        return localDate.AtMidnight().PlusTicks(localTime.TickOfDay);
    }

Any advice is appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's much easier than the way you've got it at the moment - simply use the + operator:

LocalDate date = ...;
LocalTime time = ...;
LocalDateTime dateTime = date + time;
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Very nice. Thanks Jon! –  Matt Johnson Feb 11 '13 at 17:21
    
Great! Thanks. For discoverability purposes, it could be worth including an equivalent method (especially as there are others for similar tasks). –  Erwin Mayer Feb 11 '13 at 19:29
    
@ErwinMayer: Indeed. I'll think about that... I'm not sure whether it needs to be symmetric though: LocalDate.At(LocalTime) and LocalTime.On(LocalDate)? AtTime and OnDate instead of just At and On? Will ponder. –  Jon Skeet Feb 11 '13 at 19:33
    
I'd tend to favor LocalDate.At(LocalTime) if one of the symetric alternatives has to be chosen, as it follows the time hierarchy used elsewhere (year, month, day, hour, minute, seconds...). For code readability however LocalTime.On(LocalDate) also makes sense and could be nice to have in use cases where time is the primary information (vs. the date). –  Erwin Mayer Feb 11 '13 at 19:42
1  
@FGreg: Use LocalDate.toLocalDateTime(LocalTime). –  Jon Skeet May 2 '13 at 21:16

Well, I'm not sure why it's not in the API. Maybe Jon Skeet can answer that.

I don't see anything wrong with the way you went about it in your second example, but you could calculate the tickOfMillisecond like this:

public static LocalDateTime At(this LocalDate localDate, LocalTime localTime)
{
    var tickOfMillisecond = localTime.TickOfSecond - localTime.Millisecond * 10000;
    return new LocalDateTime(localDate.Year, localDate.Month, localDate.Day, localTime.Hour, localTime.Minute, localTime.Second, localTime.Millisecond, tickOfMillisecond);
}

Personally, I think there should be a constructor for LocalDateTime so you can do this instead:

var ldt = new LocalDateTime(localDate, localTime);

One other thing - perhaps your extension method should validate the date and time are both in the same calendar system, and then pass that through to the result? I've never used any calendar but ISO, so I'm not sure on that.

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Thanks for the tip. Do you know if it TickOfMillisecond is missing on purpose or was it just somehow forgotten in the current release? I don't see any Calendar property in LocalTime... –  Erwin Mayer Feb 9 '13 at 3:51
    
I really don't know. Sorry. –  Matt Johnson Feb 9 '13 at 23:46
    
@ErwinMayer: The whole TickOfMillisecond vs TickOfSecond difference is slightly annoying, to be honest. TickOfSecond is a more sensible value in general... but fortunately there's a better way to do what you want anyway, as per my ansewr :) –  Jon Skeet Feb 11 '13 at 16:53

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